Ben Callahan – Responsive Workflows: There’s No Perfect Process

[ Transcript Available ] The web is everywhere. It’s on our desks, in our pockets, and on screens of all sizes. The complexity involved with building a website grows with each new device it must support. This cross-platform consistency requirement makes a concrete, static design process unsustainable. As flexible and responsive as the sites we’re building have to be, so too does our process for building them. In his virtual seminar, Responsive Workflows: Because There’s No Such Thing as a Perfect Process, Ben Callahan explains that there is no one way to produce a website. He believes that team managers need create an environment where a fluid process can exist and be nurtured. Ben received many questions from our audience during the live seminar. He joins Adam Churchill to tackle some of those in this podcast. What concerns do organizations have when you present this process? What tools are utilized in responsive workflows? How do you keep the team on the same page? What is a content priority guide? How does business strategy tie into a responsive workflow? Recorded: July, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Hey, everyone. Welcome to the SpoolCast. A little while ago, Ben Callahan presented a great virtual seminar for us on responsive workflows. Now, there’s over 175 UX seminars like Ben’s that are part of UIE’s All You Can Learn, if you want to get a hold of this presentation. In today’s podcast, Ben is coming back, and he’s joining us to discuss some of the...

Improve Your Mobile UX with These Six Podcasts

Below we feature the six UX luminaries giving full-day workshops at the UX Immersion Mobile Conference, April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Each of these podcasts brings insights on how to improve communication and workflow with your team and users. Structuring Your Workflow for Responsive Web Design by Ben Callahan With the need for the web to reconfigure and adapt to different devices and displays, designers and developers need to adapt to changing workflows. Ben discusses how to move towards an iterative and collaborative approach which in turn allows your clients to become more involved in the process. Listen to Ben’s podcast. The Challenges of Usability Testing Mobile Apps by Cyd Harrell Cyd Harrell has developed some good remote usability techniques that can be more effective, both in scope and cost as well as results, than a formal testing lab.( Even something as simple as “hugging” a laptop with the screen angled away from you and using the built in camera can give fantastic insights into how a user will interact with a mobile device.) Listen to Cyd’s podcast. Creating Responsive Interfaces by Brad Frost Frameworks and design patterns are no strangers in the world of web design. As responsive web design becomes common practice, making sure these templates work across every imaginable screen and device is trickier. Brad shares his concept of Atomic Design to tackle this challenge. Listen to Brad’s podcast. Responsive Web Design with Mobile in Mind by Jason Grigsby The ability for your site to display across screen sizes and devices, reduces development time and allows for one design to work anywhere. Jason the total experience...

A Bias for Making

Today’s UIEtips article looks at the communication process designers and developers follow to bring designs to life. From the waterfall approach to an Agile method, the common goal is creating, building, and executing better designs. If you or your team struggles with communicating design objectives and process with developers and other key players, then you’ll want join us for Ben Callahan’s full-day workshop on workflow on responsive web design projects at UXIM April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Step into the Wayback Machine, Sherman, and set the dial to 1994. You’ll find me in a conference room, explaining to a room of developers and product owners (back then, we called product owners either product managers or business analysts) how we would design their new product in less than a week. The expression on their faces would be one of OMG! This dude is insane. (Though, “OMG” or “dude” wouldn’t be common parlance for at least another half decade). We look at paper prototyping now and we think how quaint. Yet, back in 1994, it was a radical departure from established practice. In those olden days, design wasn’t done the way it is today. Read the article A Bias for Making. Does your team have a bias for making? Tell us about it...

Stephen Hay – Responsive Web Design Workflow

[ Transcript Available ] The web is no longer fixed width. Designs are more malleable than ever because of fluid grids, media queries, and everything else that comes with responsive web design. This makes using static photoshop comps as a deliverable unmanageable. Design workflows inevitably have to change and adapt as the way we design for the web evolves. In his virtual seminar, Responsive Web Design Workflow, Stephen Hay outlines how his workflow has changed in the face of new design processes. He believes that taking a content first approach is instrumental to working with fluid designs. This allows you to mold the design around the content instead of trying to fit the content into a fixed design. The audience had a bunch of great questions during the live seminar. Stephen joins Adam Churchill for this podcast to answer some of those questions. How do you represent graphic elements like images when designing in text? How do you translate content into semantic markup that isn’t in the vocabulary of markdown? What application do you use when designing in text? Is there any good use of lorem ipsum? Do you plan out how to display content, whether in tabs or accordions for example? What is typically the first thing presented to a client? What happens to the workflow with a increase of complexity? Do you show linear design in-browser or use a screenshot? Why should designers know how to code? Stephen also references this article by Karen McGrane in his podcast. Recorded: January, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with...

UIEtips: Group Improvisation

Designers are constantly thinking about their process, workflow, and ways to improve both. In today’s UIEtips, we feature an article from Ben Callahan that offers an alternative approach to web design and development. At this year’s UX Immersion Mobile Conference Ben is giving a full-day workshop on workflow with responsive web design projects. He’ll show you how to manage expectations and create stronger products faster. Here’s an excerpt from the article: In 1959, Miles Davis got a few of the most talented jazz musicians of all time together in a recording studio in Manhattan. The album they were about to record would go quadruple platinum and still be selling 5,000 copies a week in 2013. The title of that album was Kind of Blue and today it’s considered by many to be the greatest jazz record of all time. The musicians Miles was playing with didn’t know what they were going to record when they arrived at the studio. In fact, Miles didn’t even really know. The only preparation he had was a handful of modal scales and a few melody ideas. No sheet music or chord charts. No rehearsals or overdubbing techniques. The first time the band made it through a track is the take that’s on the album. Though web design and modal jazz may seem worlds apart, there’s a lot that improvisational records like Kind of Blue have to teach us about our process-crazed industry. Read the article Group Improvisation. What techniques does your team use to improve collaboration? Tell us about it...