UIEtips: Code Sketching – A Stretch Goal for Your Design Superpower

There was a time that providing a simple sketch on paper conveyed enough information to the stakeholders on the intent of a design. Now, with the plethora of devices a person can use, a sketch lacks the detail needed to convey how the design will appear on various devices. Today’s article discusses the benefits of sketching in code and why you shouldn’t fear it. If showing your designs on multiple devices is important to you, you’ll want to explore Nate Schutta’s full day workshop, Coding Prototypes, Even if You’ve Never Tried at the UX Immersion Mobile Conference this April. He’ll ease you into mobile prototyping–from using HTML and CSS in a text editor to debugging what you have built. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Our designs flow and move. Expressing the subtlety and nuance of how we imagine our designs is hard to do with a static sketch. Microinteractions are essential for a good experience, but difficult to imagine by just looking at a picture. We compound by desiring to express how the design will change as we move across platforms. We need to see if we’ve made something too complicated. Maybe we’ve left something important out? Maybe it’s too clumsy when there’s no keyboard? Building the entire design to discover an important flaw is a time-consuming and expensive process. We want to get our ideas out there for review and reflection. How do we make it easy to do and cost effective? Read the article Code Sketching – A Stretch Goal for Your Design Superpower. Have you added sketching in code to your design toolbox? Tell us about it...

Chris Farnum – Wireframing Strategies

[ Transcript Available ] The notion that “wireframes are dead” has been coming up every so often over the past few years. In truth, wireframes are still a valuable way for teams to communicate. Building up scenarios through state changes helps to both show and define a user’s journey through your design. Chris Farnum employs wireframing strategies in his work at ProQuest. In his virtual seminar, Choosing the Right Wireframe Strategy for Your Project, Chris explains what wireframes actually are and what they’re used for. The audience had a ton of great questions for Chris during the live seminar. He couldn’t get to all of them then, so he’s back to answer some of those questions in this podcast. Should a design team all use one tool or is it better that each person uses their preferred tool? How do you determine the appropriate level of detail for your wireframe? What if a client demands high fidelity but you know there are issues that need to be resolved in a low fidelity version first? What is the best online low-fi wireframing tool? How do you wireframe for responsive interfaces? How can you avoid doing wireframes for every breakpoint in a responsive design? What is the recommendation for sketching interactions? Recorded: February, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Hello everyone. Welcome to another edition of The SpoolCast. Recently, Chris Farnum joined us to present his virtual seminar, “Choosing the Right Wireframe Strategy for Your Project.” Chris’s seminar, along with over 120 others,...

A Bias for Making

Today’s UIEtips article looks at the communication process designers and developers follow to bring designs to life. From the waterfall approach to an Agile method, the common goal is creating, building, and executing better designs. If you or your team struggles with communicating design objectives and process with developers and other key players, then you’ll want join us for Ben Callahan’s full-day workshop on workflow on responsive web design projects at UXIM April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Step into the Wayback Machine, Sherman, and set the dial to 1994. You’ll find me in a conference room, explaining to a room of developers and product owners (back then, we called product owners either product managers or business analysts) how we would design their new product in less than a week. The expression on their faces would be one of OMG! This dude is insane. (Though, “OMG” or “dude” wouldn’t be common parlance for at least another half decade). We look at paper prototyping now and we think how quaint. Yet, back in 1994, it was a radical departure from established practice. In those olden days, design wasn’t done the way it is today. Read the article A Bias for Making. Does your team have a bias for making? Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Designs and deliverables are haikus, not epic poems

In today’s UIEtips, we’re publishing an excerpt from the UXmatters article “Developing UX Agility: Letting Go of Perfection” by Carissa Demetris, Chris Farnum, Joanna Markel, and Serena Rosenhan. In it, Chris Farnum talks about design deliverables and their role in an incremental approach to your design. If you want to hear more about Chris’ thinking on design deliverables join us for our January 30 virtual seminar Choosing the Right Wireframe Strategy for Your Project. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Once you have a firm grasp of the goals for a project and the functionality you need to design, the next steps for many UX professionals are creating user stories, wireframes, and prototypes. To kick off design, we often brainstorm and sketch. Often, cutting edge Web sites and a desire to meet or exceed competitors fuel our ideas in part. While you are in brainstorm mode, it’s certainly a good idea to sketch out a full user experience, complete with all the latest bells and whistles that would delight users and impress stakeholders. But when you begin to craft a user experience for the initial stories that you’ll deliver to your Development team for implementation, you’ll need to be a strict editor and include only the core user interface elements. Limiting scope in this way can be challenging when you are used to waterfall approach, in which you may have only one chance to document all of the user interface elements you think your design should include. Read the article Designs and Deliverables are Haikus, Not Epic Poems. How does your team limit project scope in the early design stages? Tell us about it...

Wireframes – A January 30 Virtual Seminar on Choosing the Right Strategy

The virtual seminar series is put together with your design challenges in mind.  We chase down the most important topics, and find the leading experts to show you the important how tos associated with the topic. Our next is one we’ve been chasing for some time. Wait no longer. On January 30, Chris Farnum presents Choosing the Right Wireframe Strategy for Your Project. You’ll learn to: Drive design and communication by using wireframes Plan projects by defining unique page types Build scenarios with states and layers Learn to draw “just enough” Save your team’s spot for this long-awaited presentation.      ...