Workflow on Responsive Web Design Projects

The old workflow of designing for the desktop and a tablet, working up images in Photoshop or Fireworks, falls apart with responsive design. With the growing number of mobile devices, how do you design for the multitude of screen sizes? What priority will elements take on shrinking screens? How can designers make their intentions clear for developers ready to code? These are some of the questions Ben Callahan’s workflow seminar will answer. With Ben, learn to manage expectations and create stronger products, faster by: Structuring teams to be more flexible Planning responsive projects, from soup-to-nuts Designing interfaces using faster methods Managing expectations and doing testing Pushing “the whole” instead of “the parts” Using more than one tool Learning to let go of control When Ben Callahan speaks, everyone listens. He has been a leading voice in making flexibility the core of responsive design workflows. Don’t miss his full-day workshop at UXIM14 in Denver, CO on April 7. You’ll learn how to: Build small “surgical” teams to maximize collaboration Delay decisions until the last responsible moment Overcome “baggage” that hampers a responsive process Facilitate a collaborative design process that’s still adaptable Convince others that responsive web design is a competitive advantage Identify when trust waivers, then address it with transparency Ben will help you overcome common workflow challenges. He’ll also offer practical, relatable takeaways from real-world stories and case studies from his own experiences in running projects. If your design process is missing something and you want to know how to shift the focus from the process to the people involved—check out this workshop. Get inspired at the UXIM Mobile...

UIEtips: Taxonomy-driven Content Publishing

The term for disorganized content throwing off your user experience is called content sprawl. To help you solve this problem, we’re publishing an excerpt from an article by Stephanie Lemieux and Michele Ann Jenkins of Dovecot Studio Inc. In it, they suggest taxonomies are perfect allies in the mission to tame the content chaos. If flexibility in content publishing is a key goal for your team, then it’s time to try taxonomy-driven design. On January 9, Stephanie will show you how when she presents our next virtual seminar, Managing Content Sprawl. Here’s an excerpt from the article: If you’re using a taxonomy to tag your content, you can really begin to leverage its structure to not only keep your site fresh and reduce manual content management, but also to simplify the way users navigate your content. Taxonomy-driven content publishing (also referred to as search-driven display) allows you to dynamically retrieve and display content on a page based on specific taxonomy or other structured fields enabled within your content. A content display block (or entire page) is programmed to perform a search on one or more taxonomy tags or other fields selected in the configuration. This content is dynamically loaded when the page is accessed, eliminating the need for a content manager to manually assign the content to a particular page. Read the article Taxonomy-driven Content Publishing How does your organization use taxonomy to manage content sprawl? Tell us about it...

The Insider Scoop on the Must-Attend Mobile UX Conference of 2014

The mobile boom can be daunting. More and more users are accessing your site and products on their mobile devices, making a clear case for you to know how to design for those experiences. Designers must create designs that function across multiple devices. Good design practices are being changed by a need for cross-platform experiences, and this shift affects every phase of our projects: user research, content flow, page break-up and patterns, and the ways users input data. Even project managers must approach workflow differently. That’s why we’ve created a conference just for you that focuses on mobile UX. At the UX Immersion Mobile Conference from April 7-9, in Denver, you’ll participate in two full-days of hands-on workshops and one day of 90-minute feature talks. You’ll be led on an intense dive into game-changing material by these industry experts: Cyd Harrell on User Research Brad Frost on Design Patterns Ben Callahan on Design Workflow Karen McGrane on Content Strategy Jason Grigsby on Responsive Design Nate Schutta on jQuery Prototypes Last year’s conference sold out and we know this year’s will too. There are only 100 specially-priced spots at $1,389. Sign up for the updates at the UXIM site and be one of the select few that can register starting November 19. Everyone else has to wait until November 22. We’ll add details to the UXIM site in the days to come. In the meantime, get the approval you need and be among the first to register on November 19. I can’t wait to meet up in Denver and share this experience with...

Resources around designing microinteractions

Microinteractions are often an overlooked UX element, yet they can be incredibly powerful. It can be the difference from engaging and delighting your user to turning them away from your web site. Crafting the right copy to use is just a small element. There are many factors that go into it including appropriate timing, how data influences the triggers you use, and how to convey feedback just to name a few. In this post, we’ve listed out some great free articles and podcasts on microinteractions. Additionally, you can really jump in deep with Dan Saffer’s fullday workshop, Designing Microinteractions at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. Dan’s workshop covers everything you need to know to ensure you properly create, use, and monitor microinteractions. Here’s some reading on Microinteractions Feedback Illuminates the Rules – Dan Saffer Dan discusses designing with details Designing Intuitive Microinteractions – Jared M. Spool Jared talks about microinteractions and how the social interaction they play. Designing Microinteractions – An interview with Jared M. Spool and Dan Saffer Jared and Dan discuss what microinteractions are and how they play a social role. Here’s a taste of what Dan has been saying about microinteractions Designing Microinteractions – Dan Saffer Do you think about the ringer on your phone and the ability to turn it off? Dan Saffer uses this example to kick off his book Microinteractions. Silencing the ringer on your phone is a common feature. If that feature is clunky or hard to find it interferes with needing to silence it quickly, in a crowded movie theatre for example. These tiny interactions...

Jeff Gothelf: The Champion of Lean UX

Jeff Gothelf knows better than anyone the importance of validating product ideas and concepts early in the design process to ensure you’re on the right track. He also knows the value of using rapid prototyping techniques and how to focus your efforts on achieving a business outcome rather than building features. If you agree with these ideas and want  to learn how to escape product requirement hell using Lean UX, read on. In the below post, you’ll find some great free articles and podcasts around Lean UX and Agile. But you can really dive in deep at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. In Jeff Gothelf’s workshop Escaping Product Requirement Hell Using Lean UX, You’ll learn to prioritize an endless backlog of ideas and features by talking about business outcomes earlier in your process — collaboratively — with your entire team. You will also get to see why you don’t have to build an entire product to understand if the idea has real value. Here’s some reading about Lean UX Why Lean UX? - Jeff Gothelf Jeff Gothelf lays out the rationale for why Lean UX is something new and why it’s important now Is There Any Meat on This Lean UX Thing?- Jared M. Spool Jared sets out to learn what Lean UX was all about. He talked to dozens of folks in all areas of the UX field and dug into what people mean when they talk about it. Designing with Remote Teams – Jeff Gothelf Jeff explains how to make designing work with remote teams. While the benefits of in-person collaboration and communication are...