Whitney Quesenbery and Joe O’Connor – Accessible WordPress

[ Transcript Available ] WordPress powers over 25 million sites with more than 14 billion pages viewed each month, making it one of the most popular web publishing platforms. Imagine if every one of those sites was accessible. Joe O’Connor has been a leader in making that happen, through the WordPress accessibility team which works from the inside to make WordPress into a web publishing platform for everyone. Joe joins Whitney Quesenbery for this episode of A Podcast for Everyone to talk about what it takes to make an open source platform that can help authors make their sites accessible. They talked about: How can you make your WordPress accessible? What are the best accessible-ready WordPress themes? What tools can help you keep your content accessible for everyone? Joseph Karr O’Connor lives in Santa Monica, California. When Section 508 came into effect in 1999 he began leading Accessible UX teams creating accessible web environments. Joe has been using WordPress in support of non-profits, research, and university news since 2005. Now leading Cities, a world-wide effort to build free accessible WordPress themes, Joe also contributes to Make WordPress Accessible and asks you to get involved. He’s known on Twitter as AccessibleJoe. Resources mentioned in this podcast WordPress Guidelines: Accessibility Accessibility-Ready WordPress Themes Making WordPress Accessible WP Accessibility plugin by Joe Dolson The Cities project Accessibility checking tools Accessible WordPress themes that Joe recommends: Blaskan Simone WordPress Twenty Fourteen WordPress Twenty Thirteen Recorded: July, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Whitney Quesenbery: Hi, I’m Whitney...

Steph Hay – Content-first User Experience

[ Transcript Available ] In traditional website design and development it’s common to start with the design and add your content later in the process. You may even use “lorem ipsum” as a placeholder to know where the content eventually needs to live. This causes the content creator to craft words to fit the design instead of building a design to fit the content. Without the right content your users will likely have a lackluster experience no matter how good-looking the design. Steph Hay is an advocate for a content-first approach. She believes it’s important to start with a simple document with all of the content that will be used to communicate with the user. By starting with a document, in plain language, as opposed to a wireframe or comp, all the stakeholders can have an informed discussion. No one needs to be educated on what they are looking at. Starting with the content helps focus the message you’re delivering to your users. When you build the design out from there, you can more easily determine where the appropriate places are for each type of communication. The site map and hierarchy are born out of the real content that will exist in the final product. You end up with a more cohesive and clear experience. Attend a daylong workshop with Steph at UI19 Steph’s UI19 workshop, Content-First UX Design, in Boston October 27 will show how to create more compelling products by first mapping the conversation you want to have with customers, then designing around it. Register with promotion code STEPHCAST and get $300 off the current conference price....

Whitney Quesenbery and Lainey Feingold – Structured Negotiations

[ Transcript Available ] If you work in user experience or accessibility, you probably spend part of your time on advocacy–making the case for a new design idea or a new way of working. Lawsuits are the ultimate way to get two sides to come to an agreement, but it’s also an extremely confrontational style of advocacy. A more collaborative process might be a better way to reach your goal with an agreement that is a win for everyone. Lainey Feingold is a disability rights lawyer with an extraordinary record of landmark cases, including settlements with some big companies that have made their sites more accessible. She’s done all this using Structured Negotiations, a process that lets a group of people work together to find a solution to a problem. It takes active patience, flexibility, grounded optimism, confidence, trust, and a empathy to be successful at Structured Negotiations. Lainey joins Whitney Quesenbery for this episode of A Podcast for Everyone to answer questions about this new way of reaching agreements. What are Structured Negotiations? Why are they more effective than lawsuits? How can you used the concepts in structured negotiations for UX advocacy? What are the characteristics of a good negotiator? Resources mentioned in this podcast. Law Office of Lainey Feingold About Structured Negotiations Examples of Web Accessibility Settlements Recorded: March, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Whitney Quesenbery: Hi. I’m Whitney Quesenbery, and I’m co-author with Sarah Horton of “A Web for Everyone for Rosenfeld Media.” Today, I’m talking to Lainey Feingold....

Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery – Introducing A Podcast for Everyone

[ Transcript Available ] In this premiere episode of A Podcast for Everyone, UIE’s Adam Churchill interviews Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery about the book that inspired the podcast, A Web for Everyone. They describe their journey in creating the book and share their perspectives on the importance of accessible user experience. They also provide suggestions for how product teams can use the book to support their practice. At the end, they introduce A Podcast for Everyone, a companion to the book, and give a preview of what they will be talking about in upcoming episodes. Links mentioned in this podcast A Web for Everyone Access by Design Web Style Guide Storytelling the User Experience Global UX Center for Civic Design Universal Principles of Design Principles of Universal Design Section 508 Refresh Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Recorded: February, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the first in a new series of recordings we’re calling “A Podcast for Everyone.” The concept for this podcast comes from Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery, co-authors of “A Web for Everyone,” their new book from Rosenfeld Media. Whether you’re in charge of the user experience, development, or strategy for a website, “A Web for Everyone” is sure to help you make the site accessible without sacrificing design or innovation. I’m Adam Churchill, your host for this companion podcast. A bit about our authors. Sarah Horton is director of accessible user experience and design for The Paciello Group. She works with companies and...

UIEtips: Avoiding Demographics When Recruiting Participants – An Interview with Dana Chisnell

When we’re planning a research study and get to the all-important consideration of the participants we need, we turn to Dana Chisnell.  No one spends more time thinking about how to get the right people involved with research than Dana.  In today’s reprint, Dana reveals the problems you can run into when you focus on demographics. For more of her thinking on recruiting research participants, and how that step of the study can provide bonus user research, join us on October 17, 2013 for her virtual seminar, Gaining Design Insights from Your Research Recruiting Process. Here’s an excerpt from the interview: What kinds of problems do teams run into if they focus on demographics? A few years ago, I did a study for AARP on the AARP.org web site. AARP is an organization for Americans over age 50. Among other things, AARP was interested in learning about how well their message boards, of which there were dozens active, worked for typical older adults. We conducted a usability test in three different locations with 20 participants in each location. In the first location, we recruited based on segments. We recruited 6 people in their 50s, 8 people in their 60s, 4 people in their 70s, and 2 in their 80s. AARP is about age, after all. We did not select for what people did online. When we got to the section of the test where we wanted people to do tasks with the message boards, we found that across the age brackets, most participants had not used message boards before and didn’t want to. Many simply refused to do the task. I asked them to do...