Leah Buley – UX as a Team Sport

[ Transcript Available ] User experience is rarely something you do completely alone. Even if people on the team don’t necessarily focus on UX, they could be indirectly acting in favor of it. Sometimes it comes from a lack of understanding exactly what user experience is or means. People with different approaches and skillsets can be valuable assets when incorporated into the larger human centered design focus. Though Leah Buley is the author of UX Team of One, she believes it’s uncommon that there is a superhero UX professional who flies into the room and saves a project. More often it’s a collaborative endeavor. You have to get the entire team involved in the process. Once the value of UX is apparent, you can exercise the collective skills and intelligence of the group and all work toward a better experience for a customer or user. Part of the responsibility of the UX professional on the team is to constantly frame decisions made in the context of what will be best for the users. Facilitation is an important skill in general for the user experience field. Introducing the theories and practices into the larger team will get everyone moving in the same direction and working collaboratively. Attend a daylong workshop with Leah at UI19 Leah’s UI19 workshop, UX as a Team Sport, in Boston October 29 will orient your team to customer needs so you can build the “right thing at the right time.” Register with promotion code LEAHCAST and get $300 off the current conference price. Explore Leah’s workshop   Recorded: June, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via...

Dan Saffer – Big Considerations from Microinteractions

[ Transcript Available ] User Experience is really all about delighting your users. You want them to accomplish tasks with ease and not encounter any roadblocks that are a direct result of your design. Many of the delightful things about an app or interface go unnoticed because they are the tiniest of features. These microinteractions can set the tone for your users and dictate the feel and performance of your design. Dan Saffer is an expert on microinteractions. In fact, he wrote the book on it. He says that microinteractions essentially operate based on triggers, rules, feedback, loops, and modes. For example, when you engage a scrollbar, how fast does it scroll? Or when you click a volume up button, what percent increase is each click? Just think of a car. In the broadest terms, a car is a car. But the styling of the interior, leather seats, placement of cupholders, and how the in car stereo system works all help differentiate one car from another. These are often subtle differences, but as with microinteractions, these small differences are crucial to the overall feel and experience. Attend a daylong workshop with Dan at UI19 Dan’s UI19 workshop, Designing Microinteractions, in Boston October 29 will help you design those often-overlooked UX elements—like microcopy, form controls, and system defaults—to increase your user engagement. Register with promotion code DANCAST and get $300 off the current conference price. Explore Dan’s workshop   Recorded: June, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jared Spool: Welcome everyone to another episode...

Resources around designing microinteractions

Microinteractions are often an overlooked UX element, yet they can be incredibly powerful. It can be the difference from engaging and delighting your user to turning them away from your web site. Crafting the right copy to use is just a small element. There are many factors that go into it including appropriate timing, how data influences the triggers you use, and how to convey feedback just to name a few. In this post, we’ve listed out some great free articles and podcasts on microinteractions. Additionally, you can really jump in deep with Dan Saffer’s fullday workshop, Designing Microinteractions at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. Dan’s workshop covers everything you need to know to ensure you properly create, use, and monitor microinteractions. Here’s some reading on Microinteractions Feedback Illuminates the Rules – Dan Saffer Dan discusses designing with details Designing Intuitive Microinteractions – Jared M. Spool Jared talks about microinteractions and how the social interaction they play. Designing Microinteractions – An interview with Jared M. Spool and Dan Saffer Jared and Dan discuss what microinteractions are and how they play a social role. Here’s a taste of what Dan has been saying about microinteractions Designing Microinteractions – Dan Saffer Do you think about the ringer on your phone and the ability to turn it off? Dan Saffer uses this example to kick off his book Microinteractions. Silencing the ringer on your phone is a common feature. If that feature is clunky or hard to find it interferes with needing to silence it quickly, in a crowded movie theatre for example. These tiny interactions...

Stephen Anderson – Displaying Data in Digestible Ways

[ Transcript Available ] Culling through massive amounts of data is a headache. A dense table of aggregated data points can be useful in theory, but the manner in which it’s displayed is often a hindrance. Even more than that, showing that data in a chart or graph is confusing if it’s not effectively labeled. Data is useless when you can’t make good decisions from it. Stephen Anderson is a leading thinker on design and psychology. He spends lots of time thinking about how to visualize information and uses the travel site Hipmunk as an example of a good data visualization. All the flights are listed with clear visuals; length of the flights, layovers, and times. They even let you sort the results by “agony”. But ultimately, from a cognitive standpoint, displaying the flight data in this way creates less of a burden on your short term memory and makes for an easy comparison. Many times it comes down to taking a step back and really thinking about how data is displayed. It’s very easy to fall into placing something into a grid, table, or other familiar pattern because of what’s been done in the past. By really analyzing what kind of data you have and what you’re trying to communicate, you can uncover better ways to present that data. Stephen will be presenting one of 8 daylong workshops at the User Interface 18 conference, October 21-23 in Boston. For more information, visit uiconf.com. Recorded: June, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jared...