Register for UI19 by May 15 to Secure the Lowest Rate

Take advantage of the $1,395 Rate – Register by May 15 Save money and guarantee your spot in the workshops of your choice. Register for the User Interface 19 Conference, October 27–29, in Boston at the lowest rate of $1,395 by May 15. “Both the workshops and speeches were extremely useful and inspiring. The whole experience was beyond my (high) expectations!” - Juha Rouvinen Your UI19 Registration Includes: Immediate access to UIE’s All You Can Learn for one year. This resource includes virtual seminars from many of the UI19 workshop leaders plus past conference recordings Two daylong workshops and a day of featured talks from the workshop presenters Complete conference materials from all the workshops and talks Access to video recordings of the featured talks through All You Can Learn A designer’s toolkit to help you create and communicate your design ideas Save your spot, guarantee your workshops, and get the lowest price when you sign-up by May 15. Register...

Strengthen your UX Skills with 8 Daylong Workshops

Come to UI19 in Boston, October 27-29 for two days of hands-on workshops and one day of talks. Leave with a jolt of confidence that you can create the kinds of user experiences others will envy. We’ve put together some of the brightest, most ingenious minds of our time to help you meet the UX challenges you are facing now. Mobile-centric Design Thinking Luke Wroblewski Communicating Design Leah Buley Multi-channel Service Design Marc Stickdorn Content & the Design Process Steph Hay Scenarios for Intuitive Design Kim Goodwin Effective Web Typography Tim Brown Microinteractions Dan Saffer Presenting Data Well Stephen Anderson Reserve your spot and save money Register by May 16 and get the lowest price of...

UIEtips: New Rule – Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2

In this week’s UIEtips, we offer part 2 of Josh Clark’s article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly. In it, Josh reminds us that ideally the web is a platform that can be accessed from any device, no matter what its input or output method. For now, that means opening up all desktop layouts for easy finger-tapping. Here’s an excerpt from the article: For most of its short history, web-design practice has focused on the visual-on screen size. It’s not yet in our industry’s DNA to consider physicality and environment in our layouts. That’s why many are still surprised at the idea that they can’t just use their legacy desktop layout on iPad, even though the screen size is the same. The layout looks good, sure, but that rarely means it’s also finger-friendly. The rise of the hybrids means touch is no longer the sole province of phones and tablets. It’s arrived on desktops and laptops, too. Most desktop website layouts, however, are not optimized for touch. They challenge our clumsy fingers and thumbs with small touch targets for links and menus, or they lean on hover interactions that can’t be triggered by touch at all. Few sites place primary navigation in easy reach of the thumb zone for either tablets or hybrids; they favor cursor-friendly screen-top navigation instead. Read the article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2. If you want to convert your mouse-focused desktop sites into mobile layouts with touch-friendly screens, than watch Josh’s virtual seminar, Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces. It’s now part of UIE’s All You Can Learn, the place to watch, listen,...

A Reading List That (Actually) Gets Read

Books can be like New Years’ Resolutions. You have great ambitions to get to them or through them, but eventually what gets read are the ones that were super enjoyable or really, really important for you to read. When I teach a workshop or give a talk, I often get asked for a reading list or for a suggestion on topics I tend to focus on: business strategy, UX, CX, and change. I’ve gotten to the point of recommending the things that I think turn people on, either because they make the point quickly or because they convey what they have to say in such a compelling way that you can make it through. So I’ve composed this reading list for experience, design, and strategy based on what’s most readable and reference-able. Many of these are short, fast, and compelling reads that are more fun and fascinating than burdensome to plod through. My hope is that these are the right speed and shape so that you’ll get them into your brain. Fast & fun: A designer’s intro to strategy Brand Gap and Zag, by Marty Neumeier These are the oldest books on the list, but oh-so-useful still. I refer to these two books as “gateway books” for designers who are curious about strategy. Both are fast and compelling reads and they get you thinking about strategic business questions that design can have an impact on. Zag, specifically, nails competitive differentiation and Purple Cow by Seth Godin is a good deeper read on the same subject from a marketer’s point-of-view. Fast & light: Customer-centric strategy What Do You Want Your...

A Bias for Making

Today’s UIEtips article looks at the communication process designers and developers follow to bring designs to life. From the waterfall approach to an Agile method, the common goal is creating, building, and executing better designs. If you or your team struggles with communicating design objectives and process with developers and other key players, then you’ll want join us for Ben Callahan’s full-day workshop on workflow on responsive web design projects at UXIM April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Step into the Wayback Machine, Sherman, and set the dial to 1994. You’ll find me in a conference room, explaining to a room of developers and product owners (back then, we called product owners either product managers or business analysts) how we would design their new product in less than a week. The expression on their faces would be one of OMG! This dude is insane. (Though, “OMG” or “dude” wouldn’t be common parlance for at least another half decade). We look at paper prototyping now and we think how quaint. Yet, back in 1994, it was a radical departure from established practice. In those olden days, design wasn’t done the way it is today. Read the article A Bias for Making. Does your team have a bias for making? Tell us about it...