UIEtips: 6 Tips for Organizing Sketched Artifacts

Sketching plays a vital role in UX design. It’s how we put a visual component to our ideas, communicate with others, and document our process. But how to organize and hold on to these sketches isn’t always as organized as we like. Below Nathan Curtis shares six tips on organizing sketched artifacts. Some are simple yet eye opening ideas. We realize how important it is to sketch and it’s one of the reasons that we’re giving every UI19 conference attendee a designer’s toolkit when they register for the conference by July 3. See what tools are in this kit to help you make great designs. Here’s an excerpt from the article: The more EightShapes sketches, however, the more we desire to retrieve and share those ideas later-to revisit abandoned, complex, or unrealistic notions of a better experience, to remind ourselves of passing ideas. We may find ourselves amid the next hour’s design studio summation. Or the day’s prototyping. Or the next week’s task scoping. Or the next quarter’s project proposal. But the sketch’s value extends beyond the initial presentation and discussion. Read the article: 6 Tips for Organizing Sketched Artifacts. How have you organized your archive of sketches?  Leave us a note...

UIEtips: UX Design, Role-playing & Micromoments

Stephen Anderson thinks about micro-moments in a design a lot. He even goes as far as role playing what the interaction would be like with another designer (as you’ll see in today’s article). It’s a funny and eye opening experience. This is just one part of what Stephen is covering in his full-day UI19 workshop, Design Skills for Complex Understanding and Problem Solving on October 27. See how you can present data in compelling, contextually relevant formats in his workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Good interaction design is about attending to every moment that passes between a person and the device (or system, or service) with which he or she is interacting. These moments can be explicit, as with gestures, taps, a button-click, or the completion of a form field. Or, these moments may be more elusive, such as a pause while you try and understand what is being asked of you or how to answer. It’s these internal conversations that users have at any given moment that often get overlooked. Read the article: UX Design, Role-playing & Micromoments. What micro-moments have your experiences that added to — or diminished — your experience with a design?  Leave us a note...

UIEtips: Content and Design Are Inseparable Work Partners

It’s not uncommon within organizations that web site content is treated differently and separately from the web site design process. Yet the users do not separate the two and see it as one experience. When the content and design process are not done hand-in-hand, poor user experiences is often the result. Today’s article focuses on this issue. Tying together your content and design process is such an important issue that we’ve brought in Steph Hay to do a full day workshop on it at the UI19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29. Steph will show you how to map conversations as a first step to designing customer-centric user experiences.Learn more about Steph’s workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: It’s not news that the content is the important part of the design. For years, Karen McGrane has told us that working on the design without considering the content is like giving your best friend a beautifully wrapped empty box for their birthday. They’ll enjoy opening it, but will be sorely disappointed with the entirety results. And recently, Steph Hay reminded us that “content is the entire reason people come to the design in the first place.” The new thinking is that content creation and management cannot be a separate endeavor from design creation and management. That we need to inseparably integrate the two, structurally and organizationally, to create great experiences. Read the article: Content and Design are Inseparable Work Partners. What can your organization do to make design and content feel more integrated? Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Taxonomy-driven Content Publishing

The term for disorganized content throwing off your user experience is called content sprawl. To help you solve this problem, we’re publishing an excerpt from an article by Stephanie Lemieux and Michele Ann Jenkins of Dovecot Studio Inc. In it, they suggest taxonomies are perfect allies in the mission to tame the content chaos. If flexibility in content publishing is a key goal for your team, then it’s time to try taxonomy-driven design. On January 9, Stephanie will show you how when she presents our next virtual seminar, Managing Content Sprawl. Here’s an excerpt from the article: If you’re using a taxonomy to tag your content, you can really begin to leverage its structure to not only keep your site fresh and reduce manual content management, but also to simplify the way users navigate your content. Taxonomy-driven content publishing (also referred to as search-driven display) allows you to dynamically retrieve and display content on a page based on specific taxonomy or other structured fields enabled within your content. A content display block (or entire page) is programmed to perform a search on one or more taxonomy tags or other fields selected in the configuration. This content is dynamically loaded when the page is accessed, eliminating the need for a content manager to manually assign the content to a particular page. Read the article Taxonomy-driven Content Publishing How does your organization use taxonomy to manage content sprawl? Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Announcing our Favorite Articles of 2013

Over the past year we published more than 35 articles. Here are 6 of our favorites in no particular order: What Makes an Experience Seem Innovative? There are so many better things we could be doing with our time than standing in line. But if we step out of the line, we lose our opportunity to get the service we want. Who would’ve thought you could innovate around something as simple as waiting in line? Here’s an excerpt from the article: Since customers think standing and waiting is a necessary evil without alternatives, they may not complain about it. Organizations that focus on the specific activities to resolve their perceived customer objective, may overlook the deep frustration from tool time that’s happening in the gaps between those activities. Teams that study the entire experience look into those gaps to see from where the deep frustration emerges. Addressing that frustration, when no other product or service has done so, will look innovative to the customer. Read the article What Makes an Experience Seem Innovative   Feedback Illuminates the Rules In this article, Dan Saffer discusses how a good microinteraction immediately shares a result with a user. It lets them know the next steps to take or if they’re going in the right direction. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Let’s take a microinteraction appliance like a dishwasher as an example. The dishwasher process goes something like this: a user selects a setting, turns the dishwasher on, the dishwasher washes the dishes and stops. If someone opens the dishwasher midprocess, it complains. Now, if the dishwasher has a screen, each of...