UIEtips: New Rule – Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2

In this week’s UIEtips, we offer part 2 of Josh Clark’s article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly. In it, Josh reminds us that ideally the web is a platform that can be accessed from any device, no matter what its input or output method. For now, that means opening up all desktop layouts for easy finger-tapping. Here’s an excerpt from the article: For most of its short history, web-design practice has focused on the visual-on screen size. It’s not yet in our industry’s DNA to consider physicality and environment in our layouts. That’s why many are still surprised at the idea that they can’t just use their legacy desktop layout on iPad, even though the screen size is the same. The layout looks good, sure, but that rarely means it’s also finger-friendly. The rise of the hybrids means touch is no longer the sole province of phones and tablets. It’s arrived on desktops and laptops, too. Most desktop website layouts, however, are not optimized for touch. They challenge our clumsy fingers and thumbs with small touch targets for links and menus, or they lean on hover interactions that can’t be triggered by touch at all. Few sites place primary navigation in easy reach of the thumb zone for either tablets or hybrids; they favor cursor-friendly screen-top navigation instead. Read the article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2. If you want to convert your mouse-focused desktop sites into mobile layouts with touch-friendly screens, than watch Josh’s virtual seminar, Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces. It’s now part of UIE’s All You Can Learn, the place to watch, listen,...

Sign up by 2/11 for UXIM Mobile Conference and Save $300

The increasing use of mobile devices makes designing sites and apps more complex. To design for the user, you have to completely change the ways you work and learn new tools, techniques, and patterns for success. We built the UX Immersion Mobile Conference in Denver, CO April 7-9 to help you meet those challenges. You’ll be exposed to UX luminaries through intensive full-day workshops specifically focused around the skills and techniques you need to become better at designing for the user. The price to attend all three days of the conference goes up $300 after February 11 (it goes up $100 if you’re just attending for one day). Put the money you save by registering now towards your flight or accommodations. Explore the workshops and video trailers to learn more about each...

A Bias for Making

Today’s UIEtips article looks at the communication process designers and developers follow to bring designs to life. From the waterfall approach to an Agile method, the common goal is creating, building, and executing better designs. If you or your team struggles with communicating design objectives and process with developers and other key players, then you’ll want join us for Ben Callahan’s full-day workshop on workflow on responsive web design projects at UXIM April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Step into the Wayback Machine, Sherman, and set the dial to 1994. You’ll find me in a conference room, explaining to a room of developers and product owners (back then, we called product owners either product managers or business analysts) how we would design their new product in less than a week. The expression on their faces would be one of OMG! This dude is insane. (Though, “OMG” or “dude” wouldn’t be common parlance for at least another half decade). We look at paper prototyping now and we think how quaint. Yet, back in 1994, it was a radical departure from established practice. In those olden days, design wasn’t done the way it is today. Read the article A Bias for Making. Does your team have a bias for making? Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Designs and deliverables are haikus, not epic poems

In today’s UIEtips, we’re publishing an excerpt from the UXmatters article “Developing UX Agility: Letting Go of Perfection” by Carissa Demetris, Chris Farnum, Joanna Markel, and Serena Rosenhan. In it, Chris Farnum talks about design deliverables and their role in an incremental approach to your design. If you want to hear more about Chris’ thinking on design deliverables join us for our January 30 virtual seminar Choosing the Right Wireframe Strategy for Your Project. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Once you have a firm grasp of the goals for a project and the functionality you need to design, the next steps for many UX professionals are creating user stories, wireframes, and prototypes. To kick off design, we often brainstorm and sketch. Often, cutting edge Web sites and a desire to meet or exceed competitors fuel our ideas in part. While you are in brainstorm mode, it’s certainly a good idea to sketch out a full user experience, complete with all the latest bells and whistles that would delight users and impress stakeholders. But when you begin to craft a user experience for the initial stories that you’ll deliver to your Development team for implementation, you’ll need to be a strict editor and include only the core user interface elements. Limiting scope in this way can be challenging when you are used to waterfall approach, in which you may have only one chance to document all of the user interface elements you think your design should include. Read the article Designs and Deliverables are Haikus, Not Epic Poems. How does your team limit project scope in the early design stages? Tell us about it...