UIEtips: UX Strategy Blueprint

In this week’s UIEtips, Jim Kalbach defines and discusses how to consistently create a UX strategy. Here he shares a tool with you for doing so at your organization—the UX Strategy Blueprint. If your strategy discussions feel more like political battles than progressive team-building, pay attention to Jim Kalbach. His virtual seminar on Thursday, August 28 is all about Defining a UX Design Strategy. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Analysis and planning, while necessary inputs and outputs in the strategy creation process, are not the core of strategy. You can’t analyze your way to strategy: the answers don’t magically emerge from data. And detailed roadmaps don’t provide the rationale for the activity they organize. Strategy does. It connects analysis and planning with an intentional logic that guides decision making. Read the article: UX Strategy Blueprint. Do you have a UX Strategy Blueprint to define your UX strategy? Leave us a note...

UIEtips: 6 Tips for Organizing Sketched Artifacts

Sketching plays a vital role in UX design. It’s how we put a visual component to our ideas, communicate with others, and document our process. But how to organize and hold on to these sketches isn’t always as organized as we like. Below Nathan Curtis shares six tips on organizing sketched artifacts. Some are simple yet eye opening ideas. We realize how important it is to sketch and it’s one of the reasons that we’re giving every UI19 conference attendee a designer’s toolkit when they register for the conference by July 3. See what tools are in this kit to help you make great designs. Here’s an excerpt from the article: The more EightShapes sketches, however, the more we desire to retrieve and share those ideas later-to revisit abandoned, complex, or unrealistic notions of a better experience, to remind ourselves of passing ideas. We may find ourselves amid the next hour’s design studio summation. Or the day’s prototyping. Or the next week’s task scoping. Or the next quarter’s project proposal. But the sketch’s value extends beyond the initial presentation and discussion. Read the article: 6 Tips for Organizing Sketched Artifacts. How have you organized your archive of sketches?  Leave us a note...

UIEtips: The Dirty Dozen Roadmap Roadblocks

In this week’s UIEtips, we share an article from Bruce McCarthy. In it, Bruce defines the product roadmap and offers twelve areas where organizations break down when developing roadmaps. Best of all, he shares ideas on how to put all twelve roadblocks in your rearview mirror. Want to hear more from Bruce? He’s presenting our next virtual seminar on June 26, Lean Roadmapping: Where Product Management & UX Meet. Here’s an excerpt from the article: A good roadmap inspires. It inspires buy-in from executives, inspires confidence from customers and salespeople, and inspires development teams to produce the groundbreaking products that drive significant growth.  A good roadmap keeps your organization on course toward its destination. Stating what you will do and when makes it easy to judge when you fall behind schedule or get detoured by good ideas that just don’t fit your strategic vision. Read the article: The Dirty Dozen Roadmap Roadblocks. What roadblocks have challenged your organization in creating product roadmaps?  Leave us a note...

UIEtips: Dissecting Design – Part 2

In this week’s UIEtips, we offer part two of Ben Callahan’s article, Dissecting Design. In it, he explores which tools are the most helpful for different parts of the design process. Ben was one of our top speakers at this year’s UX Immersion Mobile Conference and we’re pleased to have him back for our next virtual seminar on June 5, Responsive Workflows: Because There’s No Such Thing as a Perfect Process. Here’s an excerpt from the article: I believe many people in our industry struggle with “design in the browser” simply because they aren’t fluent with the tools needed for working that way. I’ve heard many people say, “Happy accidents don’t happen in code like they do in PhotoShop.” I can testify that this is absolutely not true. Instead, I believe it’s about where you are the most fluent. As we evaluate the best tools for the monumental task of problem solving in design, I keep coming back to the ideal of fluency as a solid principle on which to base the decision. You can’t write poetry in a language you don’t speak. Similarly, you can’t craft design using tools you’re not fluent with. Read part two of the article here. Missed part one? Read it here. What tools do you and your team find most efficient and effective in solving design problems?  Tell us about it...

UIE’s All You can Learn, a library of the skills and techniques you need to create great design

When design teams think about their project work, part of that process is identifying skills that the entire team will need, or techniques and abilities that one or more contributor may need to “bump up.”  It’s all here.  You now have at your fingertips an extensive collection of the best thinkers, showing you how to do things new and different—things you can immediately bring to your work. Creating over 160 presentations on all things UX in a library that works well for designers took some time.  But that was absolutely time well spent. We’re excited about All You Can Learn, the topics and experts we’ve gathered for you there, and hope you’ll see it as the resource we intend.   Once you create your account, you’ll have access to content when you need it, with the option to build a watch list for viewing on your schedule.   We’ve got great things planned, both in content we’ll add for you and how All You Can Learn can help you do your job.  We hope you’ll be part of the...