Jeff Gothelf – Axe Requirements-driven Product Design Live!

[ Transcript Available ] This is a sample of Jeff’s 90-minute talk from the User Interface 18 conference. There’s a traditional way of building a product. Normally there’s a huge time investment made as you come up with the idea, design, build and re-build until it’s released. At this point you’re hoping this solution solves the users’ problems, and also that it doesn’t crash and burn. And if it does fail, there’s going to be some hell to pay. Jeff Gothelf considers this “the old way” of product development. He posits that there is an immense amount of risk involved with this approach, and suggests that design and product development should be viewed as a hypothesis. Using this method, you’re putting hypotheses out there, testing them, and even if they fail, you’re continuously learning. With these “small bites” being taken, you can design with a comfort level, knowing you’re not putting the entire project at risk. You’re collecting data and therefore able to iterate based upon objective observations. If the data proves you’re heading down the wrong path, you can quickly kill the idea and move onto the next hypothesis. Want to hear more from Jeff? The recordings of the User Interface 18 conference are now available as UI18 OnDemand. Relive (or experience for the first time) all eight featured talks and Jared Spool’s informative and entertaining keynote. Get all of the details at uiconf.com. Recorded: December, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jeff: Let me share another case study. This is a...

Get yours now — 13 hours of recordings from the UI18 Conference

UI18 OnDemand gets you front row access to 10 UX experts sharing best practices and cutting edge techniques on advanced design processes, flexible team-based techniques, and meaningful data display. Recordings include: Stephen Anderson – Help Users Decide Is your phone bill easy or enjoyable to read? Help users make decisions more easily by displaying your information in highly visual, interactive, and meaningful ways. Kim Goodwin – Get More from User Research Think you don’t have time for user research? Once you see the tools and techniques Kim uses to quickly gather customer insights and prioritize designs, you’ll change your mind. Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry – Discuss Design without Losing Your Mind Overcome the endless barrage of opinions that thwart your design progress. Get the techniques to make critique a positive experience for everyone involved. Scott Berkun – Do Great Work from Anywhere How can WordPress be effective when its entire team works remotely? Managers, designers, and developers all thrive in its autonomous environment — hear why. Kevin Hoffman – Hold Meetings That Aren’t Excruciating Enjoy your meetings by applying the same design thinking that UX pros already know and love. Get real work done and build consensus, regardless of personalities and opinions. Dan Saffer – Dig into Tiny Design Details The difference between a product we love and one we only tolerate often lies in these details. Turn your product’s dull microinteractions into memorable, engaging moments. Jeff Gothelf – Axe Requirements-driven Product Design Start spending your time on the right work for your business by creating a series of hypotheses. Then, run experiments to validate which solutions are...

UIEtips: Setting the Foundation for Meaningful Critiques – Goals, Principles, Personas and Scenarios

Doing critiques well and constructively is no easy task. Often designers feel picked on or that the feedback doesn’t give enough direction. According to Adam Connor, a key concept to remember is that “critique is a form of analysis”. It’s a discussion on what is working well and what areas need improvement. To do this right you need goals. You need to ask if what you’re critiquing is reaching the objectives of the goals you and your team created. In today’s article by Adam Connor, Adam discusses how to set the foundation of a meaningful critique by using goals, principles, personas, and scenarios. In less than two weeks, Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry will lead a full-day workshop at the User Interface 18 Conference in Boston. Their workshop, Building Consensus in Critiques and Designs Studios will show you how to execute a productive design studio. You’ll follow a proven framework that goes from ideation to consensus-building. Learn more about their workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: In a recent post, Aaron talked about the importance of intent in the success of critique. Without the right intent on both sides critiques can go nowhere. Or worse, they can hurt the design, the designer and the relationship between the designer and the critics. But now lets say that the intent is right. The critics are looking to help the designer understand the impact of the decisions he or she has made. The designer has every intention of listening, of critiquing right along with the critics, and using what they learn to iterate and improve upon their design. There is still...

Resources around designing microinteractions

Microinteractions are often an overlooked UX element, yet they can be incredibly powerful. It can be the difference from engaging and delighting your user to turning them away from your web site. Crafting the right copy to use is just a small element. There are many factors that go into it including appropriate timing, how data influences the triggers you use, and how to convey feedback just to name a few. In this post, we’ve listed out some great free articles and podcasts on microinteractions. Additionally, you can really jump in deep with Dan Saffer’s fullday workshop, Designing Microinteractions at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. Dan’s workshop covers everything you need to know to ensure you properly create, use, and monitor microinteractions. Here’s some reading on Microinteractions Feedback Illuminates the Rules – Dan Saffer Dan discusses designing with details Designing Intuitive Microinteractions – Jared M. Spool Jared talks about microinteractions and how the social interaction they play. Designing Microinteractions – An interview with Jared M. Spool and Dan Saffer Jared and Dan discuss what microinteractions are and how they play a social role. Here’s a taste of what Dan has been saying about microinteractions Designing Microinteractions – Dan Saffer Do you think about the ringer on your phone and the ability to turn it off? Dan Saffer uses this example to kick off his book Microinteractions. Silencing the ringer on your phone is a common feature. If that feature is clunky or hard to find it interferes with needing to silence it quickly, in a crowded movie theatre for example. These tiny interactions...

Jeff Gothelf: The Champion of Lean UX

Jeff Gothelf knows better than anyone the importance of validating product ideas and concepts early in the design process to ensure you’re on the right track. He also knows the value of using rapid prototyping techniques and how to focus your efforts on achieving a business outcome rather than building features. If you agree with these ideas and want  to learn how to escape product requirement hell using Lean UX, read on. In the below post, you’ll find some great free articles and podcasts around Lean UX and Agile. But you can really dive in deep at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. In Jeff Gothelf’s workshop Escaping Product Requirement Hell Using Lean UX, You’ll learn to prioritize an endless backlog of ideas and features by talking about business outcomes earlier in your process — collaboratively — with your entire team. You will also get to see why you don’t have to build an entire product to understand if the idea has real value. Here’s some reading about Lean UX Why Lean UX? - Jeff Gothelf Jeff Gothelf lays out the rationale for why Lean UX is something new and why it’s important now Is There Any Meat on This Lean UX Thing?- Jared M. Spool Jared sets out to learn what Lean UX was all about. He talked to dozens of folks in all areas of the UX field and dug into what people mean when they talk about it. Designing with Remote Teams – Jeff Gothelf Jeff explains how to make designing work with remote teams. While the benefits of in-person collaboration and communication are...