UIEtips: Scenarios and Journey Maps Help Designers Become Storytellers

In today’s UIEtips, Jared Spool explains how storytelling is the core of design communication. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Knowing how to change the users’ behaviors is one thing. Knowing which behaviors to change is another. There are often many approaches to improving a design. Everyone can think they are working towards a better overall experience, but if each team member chooses a different approach, the design becomes confusing and complex. When we’re working on a team, getting the entire team to work together from the same approach becomes job one. Smaller teams (such as those with six or less folks) have always had an easier time of this than larger ones. This is because it’s more likely the smaller teams are checking in and talking to each other. Fortunately, there’s help for larger teams. It comes in a technique that is as old as humanity – storytelling. Read the article Scenarios and Journey Maps Help Designers Become Storytellers. How do you encourage creating stories in your design team? Tell us about it...

What’s in a Story?

Storytelling is an old tool, one that's provided context and captured our interest for hundreds of years. This week Marli Mesibov, a content strategist who specializes in storytelling, explains why it works so well, and how we can use it to improve our company's strategy. The post What’s in a Story? appeared first on UX...

Reimagining the 21st-century Classroom

Education in America faces tough challenges. Innovative solutions to these challenges can be found when teachers and students apply service design to the classroom, solving short-term problems while also giving students long-term skills. The 21st-century, American classroom faces major challenges. The threat of the privatization of schools1, the lack of funding, and the erosion of traditional societal institutions, has forced schools to take on the roles of “priests, psychologists, therapists, political reformers, social workers, sex advisers, or parents.”2 Now more than ever, schools are expected to not only teach children subject matter, but to teach life skills as well. This, in turn, fundamentally changes the teacher’s role in the classroom. Further, legal mandates for test-based performance evaluation have not only trickled down to the teacher’s workload, but threatened their very job. After all, if a computer can teach individualized math better than a teacher and students get higher test scores, why are teachers needed?3 This threat is most acutely manifest by the proliferation of online courses. Michael Sandel of San Jose State University recently foreshadowed the future of higher education in an open letter to fellow professors stating, “Let us not kid ourselves…administrators at C.S.U. are beginning a process of replacing faculty with cheap online education.”4 For teachers at all levels, overcoming internal and external pressures and continuing to provide fundamental value requires an innovative re-envisioning of the classroom and making it a shared experience, one that cannot be replicated by an automaton. Teachers must overcome the digital-age metaphor of learning, one which compares the human to a computer, putting knowledge into memory, emphasizing logic and measurable outcomes. Teachers...