UIEtips: 6 Tips for Organizing Sketched Artifacts

Sketching plays a vital role in UX design. It’s how we put a visual component to our ideas, communicate with others, and document our process. But how to organize and hold on to these sketches isn’t always as organized as we like. Below Nathan Curtis shares six tips on organizing sketched artifacts. Some are simple yet eye opening ideas. We realize how important it is to sketch and it’s one of the reasons that we’re giving every UI19 conference attendee a designer’s toolkit when they register for the conference by July 3. See what tools are in this kit to help you make great designs. Here’s an excerpt from the article: The more EightShapes sketches, however, the more we desire to retrieve and share those ideas later-to revisit abandoned, complex, or unrealistic notions of a better experience, to remind ourselves of passing ideas. We may find ourselves amid the next hour’s design studio summation. Or the day’s prototyping. Or the next week’s task scoping. Or the next quarter’s project proposal. But the sketch’s value extends beyond the initial presentation and discussion. Read the article: 6 Tips for Organizing Sketched Artifacts. How have you organized your archive of sketches?  Leave us a note...

Strengthen Your UX Skills with These Tools and Techniques

At the User Interface 19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29 you’ll learn new techniques and skills to make you a stronger UX Designer. Plus we’ll give you the tools to use at the conference and afterwards with a designer’s toolkit when you register by Thursday, July 3. Choose two workshops from these leaders Mobile design Luke Wroblewski Design process Leah Buley Service-design thinking Marc Stickdorn Content-first design Steph Hay User scenarios Kim Goodwin Designing with type Tim Brown Microinteractions Dan Saffer Data visualization Stephen Anderson   The tools to help you with your designs When you register by Thursday, July 3 you’ll get your own designer’s toolkit loaded with essential tools needed to make great designs. This kit will help you iterate and share your thoughts in physical form and capture all your awesome ideas during and after the conference. Sign up now to get your...

Register by July 3 and Get a Free Designer’s Toolkit

Not only does the User Interface 19 Conference dive deep into important UX topics, we’ll also give you a special designer’s toolkit when you register by July 3. Get Your Free Designer’s Toolkit Iterate and share your thoughts in physical form with your team Capture all your awesome ideas during and after the conference Avoid the time drain that digital tools cause when trying to create quick sketches and prototypes Register by 7/3 for this free designer’s tool kit   At UI19 you’ll choose from 8 different daylong workshops on advanced design processes, flexible team–based techniques, and multi–device solutions. Plus you’ll have a full day of 90-minute presentations to hear from workshop leaders you didn’t choose. Three days you shouldn’t miss. Get Your...

An Icon is Worth 1,000 Words

A picture is worth one thousand words. This aphorism means even more when we apply it to icons: save, open, and print are just a few of the many actions we associate with a simply sketched image. The “hamburger” menu icon is newer to the icon family, and yet it is now nearly as ubiquitous as its namesake food. Yet when UX designer James Foster conducted a series of A/B tests, he found it suffered in clarity compared to the simple word “menu.” James Foster began A/B testing to satisfy his curiosity: would the full hamburger test better than the simple “three lines” menu icon? It did. He then compared the full hamburger to the word “menu” surrounded by a border, and that tested even better – 12.9% better. The test led him to the conclusion that the hamburger icon is not as universally understood as a square button—like box with the name of the item. For those of us with less time on our hands, we can’t spend days running A/B tests on every icon and word combination. Even if we could, the tests alone might not provide a clear answer; plenty of designers and developers have struggled over whether icons or text are “better” with no clear decision. This article will do the heavy lifting for us, compiling research on when icons are the better choice, and when the written word will best suit our needs. Icons for space constraints The primary reason a designer might choose icons rather than text is simple: icons take up less space. This has risen to the top of the priority...

UIEtips: Code Sketching – A Stretch Goal for Your Design Superpower

There was a time that providing a simple sketch on paper conveyed enough information to the stakeholders on the intent of a design. Now, with the plethora of devices a person can use, a sketch lacks the detail needed to convey how the design will appear on various devices. Today’s article discusses the benefits of sketching in code and why you shouldn’t fear it. If showing your designs on multiple devices is important to you, you’ll want to explore Nate Schutta’s full day workshop, Coding Prototypes, Even if You’ve Never Tried at the UX Immersion Mobile Conference this April. He’ll ease you into mobile prototyping–from using HTML and CSS in a text editor to debugging what you have built. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Our designs flow and move. Expressing the subtlety and nuance of how we imagine our designs is hard to do with a static sketch. Microinteractions are essential for a good experience, but difficult to imagine by just looking at a picture. We compound by desiring to express how the design will change as we move across platforms. We need to see if we’ve made something too complicated. Maybe we’ve left something important out? Maybe it’s too clumsy when there’s no keyboard? Building the entire design to discover an important flaw is a time-consuming and expensive process. We want to get our ideas out there for review and reflection. How do we make it easy to do and cost effective? Read the article Code Sketching – A Stretch Goal for Your Design Superpower. Have you added sketching in code to your design toolbox? Tell us about it...