UX Week Keynote Speaker Amanda Dameron on Making Design More Human

If you’re a fan of Dwell magazine, you’re familiar with its unique take on modern architecture and design in the home. Dwell editor-in-chief Amanda Dameron is a passionate advocate for the philosophy of design exemplified by the homes, decor, and furnishings showcased in Dwell. In this interview, I talk with Amanda about that philosophy, the changing role of design in our culture, and her keynote at UX Week 2014 in San Francisco this September. Jesse James Garrett: One thing about Dwell that I think makes it distinctive among media entities that cover architecture and design is your emphasis on the real-world implications of design for people’s lives. Aesthetics are great, and everybody loves beautiful things, but I think that in a lot of design media, the emphasis on aesthetics becomes so overwhelming that it detaches from reality. Amanda Dameron: I think, especially in this visual culture in which we’re living, that objects and object appreciation verges into fetishism very quickly. Dwell has always thought to tell the story of the materials and the methodology that goes into a design object, going far beyond what it looks like. I think that you can’t assess the design simply by looking at an object. You really must understand the context and the techniques that go into actually creating it in the first place. Then it’s also about the experience with the object, how does it work within a life, how does it work in its relationship to the human being that’s using it. All of those things go into the way that we talk about design. JJG: Dwell is about 14 years...

8 Ways to Boost Your Team’s UX Skills

You need a conference that will enhance your team’s skills so they are ready to successfully overcome the next set of challenges you’ve set out for them. What makes UI19 unique are the workshops. The conference is dedicated to educating and inspiring the UX professional. With two days of  full-day workshops your team can divide and conquer across eight specific topics. We guarantee they’ll learn skills, processes, and techniques to immediately impact your team and company. Mobile design Luke Wroblewski Design process Leah Buley Service-design thinking Marc Stickdorn Content-first design Steph Hay User scenarios Kim Goodwin Designing with type Tim Brown Microinteractions Dan Saffer Data visualization Stephen Anderson ————————————————————————————————————————————————————————– You can’t afford NOT to send them. Take advantage of the team discount and register 4 or more people at $200 off per person. Register Your Team and...

Marc Stickdorn – Service Design Thinking

[ Transcript Available ] In the realm of user experience, disciplines and titles can take on different meanings. Determining buzzword jargon from actual, useful distinctions and processes is sometimes a bit tricky. The term Service Design has been with us for a while now. Some see it as just plain, good UX. Marc Stickdorn sees it as more than that. Marc sees service design as less of a new discipline and more a combination of previously disconnected disciplines. The collaboration of various people in the organization from developers to businesspeople is required when developing and then launching a service. He admits that if you’ve been practicing good UX, then you’re already in pretty decent shape. You possess many of the tools put to use in service design. One of the most important aspects of service design is connecting the touchpoints. Services nowadays are inherently cross-channel, and even more, expected to be. This requires research that goes beyond just the UI and the users’ context. Attend a daylong workshop with Marc at UI19 Marc’s UI19 workshop, Service Design: Creating Delightful Cross-Channel Experiences, in Boston October 27 will show how to create a cohesive customer experience by expanding beyond digital and designing for every customer touch point. Register with promotion code MARCCAST and get $300 off the current conference price. Explore Marc’s workshop   Recorded: May, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jared Spool: Hello, everyone. You are listening to yet another episode of the SpoolCast. Today, we have Marc Stickdorn, who is co-author and...

UX Week 2014: Meet the Keynotes

Every year, when we set about the task of choosing speakers for UX Week, we look for people who can bring a broad perspective to the challenges facing experience designers today. I’m particularly excited about this year’s keynotes because they may represent the most diverse range we’ve seen yet. For years, Dwell magazine’s coverage of architecture and interior design has been a major source of inspiration for the designers at Adaptive Path — not just for the obvious aesthetic appeal of the living spaces they feature, but for the clear interest they have in the way people interact with those spaces. That’s why we’re particularly excited to have Dwell editor-in-chief Amanda Dameron as our opening keynote. Amanda will be talking about the emerging patterns she’s seeing in how architects and interior designers are creating practical spaces with emotional appeal. We’ve been trying for a long time to get digital product design thinker Josh Clark at UX Week, and I’m happy to say we finally nabbed him. Josh is the author of the book Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps, and he’ll be sharing his thoughts on the deeper principles driving the evolution of digital products in the 21st Century to close out day one of UX Week. He may be best known for taking Alex Trebek to the cleaner 74 times in a row, but author Ken Jennings is also a serious design geek — specifically about maps, and the myriad ways people have used maps to communicate over the centuries. He wrote a whole book on the subject, and he’ll share with us his insights from a lifelong interest in how map...