UIEtips: Scenarios and Journey Maps Help Designers Become Storytellers

In today’s UIEtips, Jared Spool explains how storytelling is the core of design communication. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Knowing how to change the users’ behaviors is one thing. Knowing which behaviors to change is another. There are often many approaches to improving a design. Everyone can think they are working towards a better overall experience, but if each team member chooses a different approach, the design becomes confusing and complex. When we’re working on a team, getting the entire team to work together from the same approach becomes job one. Smaller teams (such as those with six or less folks) have always had an easier time of this than larger ones. This is because it’s more likely the smaller teams are checking in and talking to each other. Fortunately, there’s help for larger teams. It comes in a technique that is as old as humanity – storytelling. Read the article Scenarios and Journey Maps Help Designers Become Storytellers. How do you encourage creating stories in your design team? Tell us about it...

Designing Digital Strategies, Part 1: Cartography

As digital products and services come to comprise an increasingly important part of our everyday life, the division between the digital and the physical begins to blur. We can, for instance, see a washing machine on TV, read reviews of it online, purchase it on our phone, and have it installed by our local shop—all […] The post Designing Digital Strategies, Part 1: Cartography appeared first on UX...

UIEtips: Explore These 7 Great Podcasts from 2013

This past year we featured some fantastic podcasts from a variety of UX luminaries. It was difficult to cull the list but we managed to do just that. Here for your listening pleasure are our favorite podcasts from 2013. Designing Microinteractions Do you think about the ringer on your phone and the ability to turn it off? Dan Saffer uses this example to kick off his book Microinteractions. Silencing the ringer on your phone is a common feature. If that feature is clunky or hard to find, it interferes with needing to silence it quickly, in a crowded movie theater for example. These tiny interactions that surround the main functionality are integral to rounding out the entire experience. Listen to the podcast Lean UX: Escaping Product Requirement Hell Assumptions tend to be the downfall of many research projects. Jeff Gothelf suggests starting with an attitude that you’re testing a hypothesis which leads to a more open discussion. The main thing is, hypotheses, just like design, can change. Being flexible and iterative in your design process encourages an environment of collaboration. Listen to the podcast When Responsive Design Meets the Real World Responsive web design allows the notion of “one web” to be a reality. Designers are increasingly able to sell to their organization the idea of delivering content to multiple platforms. Putting it into practice is another story. Jason Grigsby, co-founder of Cloud Four, says that it is easier to sell the idea of responsive web design than to do it well. Listen to the podcast Prototyping for Mobile Designs Building a prototype is a great way to test...

Get yours now — 13 hours of recordings from the UI18 Conference

UI18 OnDemand gets you front row access to 10 UX experts sharing best practices and cutting edge techniques on advanced design processes, flexible team-based techniques, and meaningful data display. Recordings include: Stephen Anderson – Help Users Decide Is your phone bill easy or enjoyable to read? Help users make decisions more easily by displaying your information in highly visual, interactive, and meaningful ways. Kim Goodwin – Get More from User Research Think you don’t have time for user research? Once you see the tools and techniques Kim uses to quickly gather customer insights and prioritize designs, you’ll change your mind. Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry – Discuss Design without Losing Your Mind Overcome the endless barrage of opinions that thwart your design progress. Get the techniques to make critique a positive experience for everyone involved. Scott Berkun – Do Great Work from Anywhere How can WordPress be effective when its entire team works remotely? Managers, designers, and developers all thrive in its autonomous environment — hear why. Kevin Hoffman – Hold Meetings That Aren’t Excruciating Enjoy your meetings by applying the same design thinking that UX pros already know and love. Get real work done and build consensus, regardless of personalities and opinions. Dan Saffer – Dig into Tiny Design Details The difference between a product we love and one we only tolerate often lies in these details. Turn your product’s dull microinteractions into memorable, engaging moments. Jeff Gothelf – Axe Requirements-driven Product Design Start spending your time on the right work for your business by creating a series of hypotheses. Then, run experiments to validate which solutions are...

UIEtips: LiRPPS – Lightweight, Research-Based Principles, Personas, and Scenarios – Part 2

In LiRPPS: Lightweight, Research-Based Principles, Personas, and Scenarios – Part 1, I began to tell you how to use a lightweight, research-based approach to create usable decision-making references for designers. Well, now I’m going to tell you about how you can actually do them. Are you ready to go? Here’s an excerpt from the article: We use a simple rule to decide who gets a say in creating our personas, scenarios, and principles: only people who went on a minimum of two field visits. This way everyone is basing their decisions on research. If we let folks who haven’t been on visits participate, then they’ll draw from their own experiences or people we hadn’t talked to in this round of research. That reduces the chance we’ll get personas that match our audience, which, in turn, makes the reference tools less valuable. Making this rule from the start of the project means everyone understands the price of entry. Want to help make the personas, scenarios, and design principles? Then you need to visit at least two sites and take notes. If you haven’t figured it out, this is the secret part of our agenda. There’s lots of evidence to show the more exposure team members have to real users doing real work, the better the design. The reference tools we’re creating help us stretch the effects of that exposure, so without it, those tools are useless. Read the article LiRPPS: Lightweight, Research-Based Principles, Personas, and Scenarios – Part 2. What process does your team follow when creating personas, scenarios, and principles? Share your thoughts...