UIEtips: Code Sketching – A Stretch Goal for Your Design Superpower

There was a time that providing a simple sketch on paper conveyed enough information to the stakeholders on the intent of a design. Now, with the plethora of devices a person can use, a sketch lacks the detail needed to convey how the design will appear on various devices. Today’s article discusses the benefits of sketching in code and why you shouldn’t fear it. If showing your designs on multiple devices is important to you, you’ll want to explore Nate Schutta’s full day workshop, Coding Prototypes, Even if You’ve Never Tried at the UX Immersion Mobile Conference this April. He’ll ease you into mobile prototyping–from using HTML and CSS in a text editor to debugging what you have built. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Our designs flow and move. Expressing the subtlety and nuance of how we imagine our designs is hard to do with a static sketch. Microinteractions are essential for a good experience, but difficult to imagine by just looking at a picture. We compound by desiring to express how the design will change as we move across platforms. We need to see if we’ve made something too complicated. Maybe we’ve left something important out? Maybe it’s too clumsy when there’s no keyboard? Building the entire design to discover an important flaw is a time-consuming and expensive process. We want to get our ideas out there for review and reflection. How do we make it easy to do and cost effective? Read the article Code Sketching – A Stretch Goal for Your Design Superpower. Have you added sketching in code to your design toolbox? Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Responsive Design for Apps

In this week’s UIEtips article, Jason Grigsby tackles the concept of responsive design for mobile apps. He looks at widgets for desktop and mobile and explores the idea if phones are really different platforms than tablets. When it comes to incorporating and understanding mobile first responsive design, Jason Grigsby is one of the UX superstars to turn to. That’s why we’ve asked him to do a full-day workshop at this year’s UX Immersion Mobile Conference, April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Here’s an excerpt from the article:  A few months ago I was tasked with finding a good solution for a client who wanted to move to responsive design, but had a web app that they needed to support as well. The question they asked is one that I’ve seen others argue about in the past: does responsive design make sense for apps? Read the article Responsive Design for Apps. How does your company decide which form factors to design for when developing a responsive app? Tell us about it...

Sign up by 2/11 for UXIM Mobile Conference and Save $300

The increasing use of mobile devices makes designing sites and apps more complex. To design for the user, you have to completely change the ways you work and learn new tools, techniques, and patterns for success. We built the UX Immersion Mobile Conference in Denver, CO April 7-9 to help you meet those challenges. You’ll be exposed to UX luminaries through intensive full-day workshops specifically focused around the skills and techniques you need to become better at designing for the user. The price to attend all three days of the conference goes up $300 after February 11 (it goes up $100 if you’re just attending for one day). Put the money you save by registering now towards your flight or accommodations. Explore the workshops and video trailers to learn more about each...

Stephen Hay – Responsive Web Design Workflow

[ Transcript Available ] The web is no longer fixed width. Designs are more malleable than ever because of fluid grids, media queries, and everything else that comes with responsive web design. This makes using static photoshop comps as a deliverable unmanageable. Design workflows inevitably have to change and adapt as the way we design for the web evolves. In his virtual seminar, Responsive Web Design Workflow, Stephen Hay outlines how his workflow has changed in the face of new design processes. He believes that taking a content first approach is instrumental to working with fluid designs. This allows you to mold the design around the content instead of trying to fit the content into a fixed design. The audience had a bunch of great questions during the live seminar. Stephen joins Adam Churchill for this podcast to answer some of those questions. How do you represent graphic elements like images when designing in text? How do you translate content into semantic markup that isn’t in the vocabulary of markdown? What application do you use when designing in text? Is there any good use of lorem ipsum? Do you plan out how to display content, whether in tabs or accordions for example? What is typically the first thing presented to a client? What happens to the workflow with a increase of complexity? Do you show linear design in-browser or use a screenshot? Why should designers know how to code? Stephen also references this article by Karen McGrane in his podcast. Recorded: January, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with...

Workflow on Responsive Web Design Projects

The old workflow of designing for the desktop and a tablet, working up images in Photoshop or Fireworks, falls apart with responsive design. With the growing number of mobile devices, how do you design for the multitude of screen sizes? What priority will elements take on shrinking screens? How can designers make their intentions clear for developers ready to code? These are some of the questions Ben Callahan’s workflow seminar will answer. With Ben, learn to manage expectations and create stronger products, faster by: Structuring teams to be more flexible Planning responsive projects, from soup-to-nuts Designing interfaces using faster methods Managing expectations and doing testing Pushing “the whole” instead of “the parts” Using more than one tool Learning to let go of control When Ben Callahan speaks, everyone listens. He has been a leading voice in making flexibility the core of responsive design workflows. Don’t miss his full-day workshop at UXIM14 in Denver, CO on April 7. You’ll learn how to: Build small “surgical” teams to maximize collaboration Delay decisions until the last responsible moment Overcome “baggage” that hampers a responsive process Facilitate a collaborative design process that’s still adaptable Convince others that responsive web design is a competitive advantage Identify when trust waivers, then address it with transparency Ben will help you overcome common workflow challenges. He’ll also offer practical, relatable takeaways from real-world stories and case studies from his own experiences in running projects. If your design process is missing something and you want to know how to shift the focus from the process to the people involved—check out this workshop. Get inspired at the UXIM Mobile...