Improve Communication With Your Remote Team

OK. Your meeting is going perfectly. Then a remote team member says, “I don’t understand. Can you show me what you mean?” PANIC! MEETING IS DERAILING! But you’re about to save the day. You plug in your trusty IPEVO document camera and focus in on the pen and paper. As you make your sketch you begin to hear folks saying, “I get it,” and the whole team is back on track. How do you get this nifty tool? You register for the UX Immersion Mobile Conference by January 30. Why You Need the IPEVO Document Camera: Share your design ideas and sketches with remote teams to ensure everyone is on the same page Document individual sketches during design studios to a digital file for easy access in the future Project sketches to large audiences to convey your designs Get everyone participating and working together saving time and increasing productivity Conduct usability tests remotely while letting the team back in the office watch Register by January 30 to Get Your Free IPEVO We’re always looking to bring you new resources, processes, and techniques to help you become a better designer. Now we have a great tool that we’re excited to include with your UXIM registration, the IPEVO document camera. But it’s only available until January 30 so be sure to register now. Explore the conference and IPEVO camera at...

Jeff Gothelf – Axe Requirements-driven Product Design Live!

[ Transcript Available ] This is a sample of Jeff’s 90-minute talk from the User Interface 18 conference. There’s a traditional way of building a product. Normally there’s a huge time investment made as you come up with the idea, design, build and re-build until it’s released. At this point you’re hoping this solution solves the users’ problems, and also that it doesn’t crash and burn. And if it does fail, there’s going to be some hell to pay. Jeff Gothelf considers this “the old way” of product development. He posits that there is an immense amount of risk involved with this approach, and suggests that design and product development should be viewed as a hypothesis. Using this method, you’re putting hypotheses out there, testing them, and even if they fail, you’re continuously learning. With these “small bites” being taken, you can design with a comfort level, knowing you’re not putting the entire project at risk. You’re collecting data and therefore able to iterate based upon objective observations. If the data proves you’re heading down the wrong path, you can quickly kill the idea and move onto the next hypothesis. Want to hear more from Jeff? The recordings of the User Interface 18 conference are now available as UI18 OnDemand. Relive (or experience for the first time) all eight featured talks and Jared Spool’s informative and entertaining keynote. Get all of the details at uiconf.com. Recorded: December, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jeff: Let me share another case study. This is a...

UIEtips: Designing with Remote Teams

Collaboration is a critical part of the design process. With more teams consisting of members who work remotely, this can be a challenge. In today’s article, an excerpt from Jeff Gothelf’s book Lean UX, Jeff outlines the biggest challenges encountered with remote collaboration. Jeff says that it all comes down to communication. He knows what it takes to design effectively in this distributed environment. Jeff dives deeper into what it takes to be successful with remote teams in his upcoming virtual seminar. The tactics he shares for working with remote teams include a host of Lean methods. Additionally, Jeff is leading a full-day workshop at this year’s UI18 COnference in Boston, October 21-23 on Escaping Product Requirement Hell Using Lean UX.   Here’s an excerpt from the article: There’s been no shortage of coverage lately about the different strategies companies employ when it comes to their distributed work force. Certain companies, like Automattic – makers of WordPress, have an entirely remote workforce and swear it’s the only way to work. Other companies, like Yahoo!, have made headlines recently when CEO Marissa Mayer demanded all remote employees come back to the office. LivingSocial has promoted a distributed team environment under the leadership of now-departed SVP of Technology Chad Fowler. The poster children for distributed teams, 37 Signals, swear by this approach to the point that they’ve written a book on the topic. What has been missing from the conversation to date is context – the context of the work these companies are doing and the context of their current environments. It seems that, as with most things design and UX,...

Adam Connor – Design Studio: Building Consensus Early in Your Design Process

[ Transcript Available ] Getting two people to agree on something is a difficult task in any aspect of life. Getting a whole team to agree on a design, where underlying feelings, ownership, and organizational hierarchy are involved, can be an even greater challenge. That’s not even counting the dreaded “swoop and poop” scenario. The trick is to get everyone involved early in the design process and a design studio is a perfect tool for just that. Adam Connor of Mad*Pow deals a lot with critique sessions and design studios. Adam knows the value of getting the entire team and stakeholders together in a collaborative environment to sketch and share ideas. In his virtual seminar Design Studio: Building Consensus Early in Your Design Process, Adam outlined his process for running a studio and offer tips to aid in gaining consensus. A bunch of great questions were asked during the live seminar and in this podcast Adam joins Adam Churchill of UIE to address some of them including, How do you run a design studio with remote members of a team? What’s the appropriate structure of a studio, time-wise, to make it worthwhile? Who do you involve in a studio? Is the facilitator someone on the design team, and are they actively involved in the studio? How do you manage difficult participants? In addition to his virtual seminar, Adam will be presenting his thinking on design studio and critique along with Aaron Irizarry in a daylong workshop at the User Interface 18 conference, October 21-23 in Boston. For more information you can check out Adam and Aaron’s previous podcast, or...