A Bias for Making

Today’s UIEtips article looks at the communication process designers and developers follow to bring designs to life. From the waterfall approach to an Agile method, the common goal is creating, building, and executing better designs. If you or your team struggles with communicating design objectives and process with developers and other key players, then you’ll want join us for Ben Callahan’s full-day workshop on workflow on responsive web design projects at UXIM April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Step into the Wayback Machine, Sherman, and set the dial to 1994. You’ll find me in a conference room, explaining to a room of developers and product owners (back then, we called product owners either product managers or business analysts) how we would design their new product in less than a week. The expression on their faces would be one of OMG! This dude is insane. (Though, “OMG” or “dude” wouldn’t be common parlance for at least another half decade). We look at paper prototyping now and we think how quaint. Yet, back in 1994, it was a radical departure from established practice. In those olden days, design wasn’t done the way it is today. Read the article A Bias for Making. Does your team have a bias for making? Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Designs and deliverables are haikus, not epic poems

In today’s UIEtips, we’re publishing an excerpt from the UXmatters article “Developing UX Agility: Letting Go of Perfection” by Carissa Demetris, Chris Farnum, Joanna Markel, and Serena Rosenhan. In it, Chris Farnum talks about design deliverables and their role in an incremental approach to your design. If you want to hear more about Chris’ thinking on design deliverables join us for our January 30 virtual seminar Choosing the Right Wireframe Strategy for Your Project. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Once you have a firm grasp of the goals for a project and the functionality you need to design, the next steps for many UX professionals are creating user stories, wireframes, and prototypes. To kick off design, we often brainstorm and sketch. Often, cutting edge Web sites and a desire to meet or exceed competitors fuel our ideas in part. While you are in brainstorm mode, it’s certainly a good idea to sketch out a full user experience, complete with all the latest bells and whistles that would delight users and impress stakeholders. But when you begin to craft a user experience for the initial stories that you’ll deliver to your Development team for implementation, you’ll need to be a strict editor and include only the core user interface elements. Limiting scope in this way can be challenging when you are used to waterfall approach, in which you may have only one chance to document all of the user interface elements you think your design should include. Read the article Designs and Deliverables are Haikus, Not Epic Poems. How does your team limit project scope in the early design stages? Tell us about it...

Wireframes – A January 30 Virtual Seminar on Choosing the Right Strategy

The virtual seminar series is put together with your design challenges in mind.  We chase down the most important topics, and find the leading experts to show you the important how tos associated with the topic. Our next is one we’ve been chasing for some time. Wait no longer. On January 30, Chris Farnum presents Choosing the Right Wireframe Strategy for Your Project. You’ll learn to: Drive design and communication by using wireframes Plan projects by defining unique page types Build scenarios with states and layers Learn to draw “just enough” Save your team’s spot for this long-awaited presentation.      ...

UIEtips: Atomic Design

It’s quite common for designers to develop design systems and libraries of patterns. A designer can save a considerable amount of time if they develop a reliable design system. One that goes beyond colors, fonts, grid etc but rather focuses more on how the various elements and parts become a whole. In today’s UIEtips, we feature a post from Brad Frost where he explains a methodology for creating design systems. It’s called Atomic Design. It’s a term rising in popularity. We’re fortunate that Brad is giving a daylong workshop at this year’s UXIM conference in Denver, April 7-9. He’ll show you how your design team can establish a practical foundation to make flexible, adaptive UIs. Learn more about Brad’s workshop, Using Atomic Design to Create Responsive Interfaces. Here’s an excerpt from the article: The thought is that all matter (whether solid, liquid, gas, simple, complex, etc) is comprised of atoms. Those atomic units bond together to form molecules, which in turn combine into more complex organisms to ultimately create all matter in our universe. Similarly, interfaces are made up of smaller components. This means we can break entire interfaces down into fundamental building blocks and work up from there. That’s the basic gist of atomic design. Read the article Atomic Design. Does your company build interfaces using atomic design patterns? Tell us about it...

Coding Prototypes, Even if You’ve Never Tried

An hour of prototyping can save days of meetings and misunderstandings. Collaborate with developers earlier to refine interactions; your team — and users — will thank you for it. Let Nate Schutta take the scare out of using JavaScript and jQuery to build mobile prototypes, using HTML and CSS in a text editor, and debugging what you’ve built. Come and see for yourself that you don’t need JavaScript expertise to build a simple application. Nate’s workshop, Coding Prototypes Even If You’ve Never Tried, will cover: Demystifying JavaScript Digging into jQuery Mobile Using jQuery Mobile Building a mobile app Fitting the parts together Showing your vision to developers Stepping beyond basic CSS and HTML Nate is one of those people who makes everyone feel comfortable. His expertise in prototyping comes from working with cross-functional teams. As a senior software engineer, Nate focuses on making usable applications — the ideal end-result of any project. He’ll teach you how to: Use browser tools and a text editor, comfortably Debug what’s screwed up Address often-overlooked pieces like error messages Use the not-so-mysterious dollar sign ($) with ease Understand and navigate a document library Simulate a mobile interface right on your laptop Nate Schutta will help you build out the pages for a prototype, use tools like lists, create a detail page, decide how to handle transitions, and experiment with different themes. After his workshop at UXIM14 on April 9 in Denver, CO you’ll have everything you need to get your mobile prototype up and running. See you at...