UIEtips: New Rule – Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2

In this week’s UIEtips, we offer part 2 of Josh Clark’s article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly. In it, Josh reminds us that ideally the web is a platform that can be accessed from any device, no matter what its input or output method. For now, that means opening up all desktop layouts for easy finger-tapping. Here’s an excerpt from the article: For most of its short history, web-design practice has focused on the visual-on screen size. It’s not yet in our industry’s DNA to consider physicality and environment in our layouts. That’s why many are still surprised at the idea that they can’t just use their legacy desktop layout on iPad, even though the screen size is the same. The layout looks good, sure, but that rarely means it’s also finger-friendly. The rise of the hybrids means touch is no longer the sole province of phones and tablets. It’s arrived on desktops and laptops, too. Most desktop website layouts, however, are not optimized for touch. They challenge our clumsy fingers and thumbs with small touch targets for links and menus, or they lean on hover interactions that can’t be triggered by touch at all. Few sites place primary navigation in easy reach of the thumb zone for either tablets or hybrids; they favor cursor-friendly screen-top navigation instead. Read the article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2. If you want to convert your mouse-focused desktop sites into mobile layouts with touch-friendly screens, than watch Josh’s virtual seminar, Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces. It’s now part of UIE’s All You Can Learn, the place to watch, listen,...

UIEtips: New Rule – Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly

Josh Clark’s article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly reminds us that the web can be accessed from any device, regardless of its input or output method. For now, that means opening up all desktop layouts for easy finger-tapping. If you want to convert your mouse-focused desktop sites into mobile layouts with touch-friendly screens, then don’t miss Josh’s virtual seminar, Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces. It’s happening this Thursday, March 13, at 1:30pm ET. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Touch has landed on the desktop. A whole new category of touch devices is flooding the consumer market in coordination with the release of Windows 8: touchscreen laptops and tablet/keyboard combos. These new hybrid combinations of touch and keyboard create a new ergonomic environment… and fresh demands on designers. Like tablets before them, the ergonomics of these hybrid gizmos demand UI conventions that depart from desktop layouts of similar screen size. The hybrids not only need big touch targets to accommodate clumsy fingers, but they also need controls and navigation conveniently placed where hands naturally come to rest. Designing for touch introduces elements of industrial design: physical comfort and ease are critical considerations. Read the article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly. How do you design for touch-friendly interfaces? Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Responsive Design for Apps

In this week’s UIEtips article, Jason Grigsby tackles the concept of responsive design for mobile apps. He looks at widgets for desktop and mobile and explores the idea if phones are really different platforms than tablets. When it comes to incorporating and understanding mobile first responsive design, Jason Grigsby is one of the UX superstars to turn to. That’s why we’ve asked him to do a full-day workshop at this year’s UX Immersion Mobile Conference, April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Here’s an excerpt from the article:  A few months ago I was tasked with finding a good solution for a client who wanted to move to responsive design, but had a web app that they needed to support as well. The question they asked is one that I’ve seen others argue about in the past: does responsive design make sense for apps? Read the article Responsive Design for Apps. How does your company decide which form factors to design for when developing a responsive app? Tell us about it...