Lean Roadmapping: Where Product Management & UX Meet, Our June 26 Virtual Seminar

Imagine a conversation between a UX designer and a product manager. This conversation delves into big-picture business goals and fast, low-risk ways to test design ideas—such as prototyping—that might achieve those goals. After all, this is the quickest way to gather real user data to inform a practical roadmap that’s focused on what problem you’re going to solve for customers. Sound interesting? On June 26, Bruce McCarthy shows you how to make these conversations—and more importantly their amazing outcomes—actually happen. Attend this seminar, especially if you: Would love to focus on getting the right things really right, rather than getting a whole lot things about half right Are a UX designer who feels trapped in the weeds on a daily basis and wants to take a big step back to understand business goals first Are a product manager responsible for creating roadmaps, but want to validate that users actually want what your team is planning to build before you commit your resources Want to learn how to make clickable mockups and prototypes to test ideas early, and also to have another tool for prioritizing which features to add or remove If you feel like you’re being asked for an endless list of features–or designing those features without the context of “why,” then register for Bruce’s...

UIEtips: Why Lean UX?

In today’s UIEtips, we reprint an article on the debate and discussion surrounding Lean UX. Some have seen it as a condemnation of extensive documentation while others have said it’s a rebranding of techniques they’ve been practicing for years. In this excerpt from Lean UX: Applying Lean Principles to Improve User Experience, authors Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden lay out their rationale for why Lean UX is something new and why it’s important now. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Working in software, designers faced new challenges. We had to figure out the grammar of this new medium, and as we did, we saw new specialties such as interaction design and information architecture emerge. But the process by which designers practiced remained largely unchanged. We still designed products in great detail in advance, because we still had to deal with a “manufacturing” process: our work had to be duplicated onto floppy disks and CDs, which were then distributed to market in exactly the same way that physical goods were distributed. The cost of getting it wrong remained high. Read the article Why Lean UX?. If you want a learning-focused process that rallies your entire team around continuous research-and more effective design outcomes-then join us for Josh Seiden’s April 3 virtual seminar, Lean UX: Forming & Testing Hypotheses. How have you implemented Lean UX in your organization?  Tell us about it...

Lean UX: Forming & Testing Hypotheses

Join us for our next Virtual Seminar, Lean UX Forming Testing Hypotheses.  Its happening Thursday, April 3.  It’s easy to talk about features. Fun, even. But easy and fun doesn’t always translate to functional, profitable, or sustainable. That’s where Lean UX comes in—it reframes a typical design process from one driven by deliverables to one driven by data, instead. Josh Seiden has been there, done that—and he’s going to show us how to change our thinking, too. You’ll Learn how to Start with a hypothesis instead of requirements Write a typical hypothesis Go from hypothesis to experiment Avoid common testing pitfalls If you want a learning-focused process that rallies your entire team around continuous research—and more effective design outcomes—then don’t miss Josh’s seminar....

UIEtips: Explore These 7 Great Podcasts from 2013

This past year we featured some fantastic podcasts from a variety of UX luminaries. It was difficult to cull the list but we managed to do just that. Here for your listening pleasure are our favorite podcasts from 2013. Designing Microinteractions Do you think about the ringer on your phone and the ability to turn it off? Dan Saffer uses this example to kick off his book Microinteractions. Silencing the ringer on your phone is a common feature. If that feature is clunky or hard to find, it interferes with needing to silence it quickly, in a crowded movie theater for example. These tiny interactions that surround the main functionality are integral to rounding out the entire experience. Listen to the podcast Lean UX: Escaping Product Requirement Hell Assumptions tend to be the downfall of many research projects. Jeff Gothelf suggests starting with an attitude that you’re testing a hypothesis which leads to a more open discussion. The main thing is, hypotheses, just like design, can change. Being flexible and iterative in your design process encourages an environment of collaboration. Listen to the podcast When Responsive Design Meets the Real World Responsive web design allows the notion of “one web” to be a reality. Designers are increasingly able to sell to their organization the idea of delivering content to multiple platforms. Putting it into practice is another story. Jason Grigsby, co-founder of Cloud Four, says that it is easier to sell the idea of responsive web design than to do it well. Listen to the podcast Prototyping for Mobile Designs Building a prototype is a great way to test...