UX Week 2014 Keynote Josh Clark on the Future of Digital Product Design

Josh Clark’s particular mix of practical realism and thoughtful reflection is an ideal match for UX Week. Josh is the author of the book Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps, and frequently gives workshops and talks at conferences around the world. In this interview, Josh and I talk about the current trends in digital product design, and where those trends might be heading. Jesse James Garrett: Josh, tell me a little bit about how you got to where you are and how your work has evolved in recent years. Josh Clark: My career path naturally didn’t begin with internet technology or mobile or multi-device stuff. It’s funny. I have a 14-year-old daughter, and when I was her age, the stuff that we do now didn’t even exist. Which makes me wonder, when she is my age, what new things are going to exist that don’t now. But I started out as a storyteller, which is very much still what I think I do now. I began as a journalist, as a documentary producer for public television. One of the great things about that was learning how to tell a formal linear story in dramatic terms. But then the Internet burst on the scene, and all of a sudden, there was this really accessible new form of storytelling, very democratic in terms of access, where the rules hadn’t yet been decided, they were very much evolving. So I really jumped in with both feet. I do think we are storytellers; we craft and shape and mold stories and behaviors. I think that those stories have grown especially personal as our devices...

UX Week 2014 Twitter Contest!

Hello UX Week attendees, friends, and community! We are thrilled to announce the first ever UX Week 2014 Twitter Contest! Four UX Week attendees will be selected to have dinner on Thursday, September 11, 2014 at 7pm with Jesse James Garrett and UX Week keynote Josh Clark of Global Moxie! You can enter by following these 3 easy steps: 1. Register for UX Week (attendees who have already registered skip this step) 2. Follow @uxweek (unless you already do!) 3. Write a Tweet mentioning which UX Week 2014 talk and/or workshop you’re excited for and mention @uxweek or use hashtag #UXweek. Be sure to post your Tweet(s) by Friday, August 15, 2014. Contest Information: Tweet as much as you want. One entry per Tweet, so the more Tweets you post the more chances you have to win! We’ll announce the four winners on Friday, August 22, 2014. Verification of UX Week registration will be required in order to win. Adaptive Path will take care of transportation to the selected restaurant. Winners will receive additional information on logistics leading up to UX Week. #UXweek...

UX Week 2014 Workshops Preview

There’s nothing like a good workshop for amping up a skill or gaining a new one. Workshops are also great opportunities to meet and exchange ideas with people who do the same kind of work or face similar challenges. That’s why UX Week workshops in particular really stand out. We carefully select topics and workshop leaders in direct response to what we see in the discipline and the problems our clients ask us to solve. In short, we look for topics and activities that will arm experience designers with what they need to be better at what they do. NEW FOR UX WEEK 2014 A big challenge at any conference is selecting the workshops to attend. Too often, two (or more!) sessions you want to sign up for are scheduled at exactly the same time! Well, for 2014 we’re doing something about that very issue. Through the magic of logistics, we’re offering each workshop twice, on different days, so there’s a lot of selection flexibility. We’re also offering a mix of half-day and full-day workshops, so you can pack in a broader range of learning opportunities. AN AWESOME LINEUP It’s a good thing the new schedule is more flexible, because this year we have an especially great lineup of workshop leaders and topics, covering everything from mobile and responsive design, prototyping, sketching, storytelling, and service design to building great teams. Here’s a sampling of what’s in the lineup: Designer, developer, author –– and now UX Week 2014 keynote speaker — Josh Clark will cover everything you need to know for effective touchscreen design in his full-day Designing for Touch...

UX Week 2014: Meet the Keynotes

Every year, when we set about the task of choosing speakers for UX Week, we look for people who can bring a broad perspective to the challenges facing experience designers today. I’m particularly excited about this year’s keynotes because they may represent the most diverse range we’ve seen yet. For years, Dwell magazine’s coverage of architecture and interior design has been a major source of inspiration for the designers at Adaptive Path — not just for the obvious aesthetic appeal of the living spaces they feature, but for the clear interest they have in the way people interact with those spaces. That’s why we’re particularly excited to have Dwell editor-in-chief Amanda Dameron as our opening keynote. Amanda will be talking about the emerging patterns she’s seeing in how architects and interior designers are creating practical spaces with emotional appeal. We’ve been trying for a long time to get digital product design thinker Josh Clark at UX Week, and I’m happy to say we finally nabbed him. Josh is the author of the book Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps, and he’ll be sharing his thoughts on the deeper principles driving the evolution of digital products in the 21st Century to close out day one of UX Week. He may be best known for taking Alex Trebek to the cleaner 74 times in a row, but author Ken Jennings is also a serious design geek — specifically about maps, and the myriad ways people have used maps to communicate over the centuries. He wrote a whole book on the subject, and he’ll share with us his insights from a lifelong interest in how map...

UIEtips: New Rule – Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2

In this week’s UIEtips, we offer part 2 of Josh Clark’s article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly. In it, Josh reminds us that ideally the web is a platform that can be accessed from any device, no matter what its input or output method. For now, that means opening up all desktop layouts for easy finger-tapping. Here’s an excerpt from the article: For most of its short history, web-design practice has focused on the visual-on screen size. It’s not yet in our industry’s DNA to consider physicality and environment in our layouts. That’s why many are still surprised at the idea that they can’t just use their legacy desktop layout on iPad, even though the screen size is the same. The layout looks good, sure, but that rarely means it’s also finger-friendly. The rise of the hybrids means touch is no longer the sole province of phones and tablets. It’s arrived on desktops and laptops, too. Most desktop website layouts, however, are not optimized for touch. They challenge our clumsy fingers and thumbs with small touch targets for links and menus, or they lean on hover interactions that can’t be triggered by touch at all. Few sites place primary navigation in easy reach of the thumb zone for either tablets or hybrids; they favor cursor-friendly screen-top navigation instead. Read the article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2. If you want to convert your mouse-focused desktop sites into mobile layouts with touch-friendly screens, than watch Josh’s virtual seminar, Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces. It’s now part of UIE’s All You Can Learn, the place to watch, listen,...