UIEtips: UX Design, Role-playing & Micromoments

Stephen Anderson thinks about micro-moments in a design a lot. He even goes as far as role playing what the interaction would be like with another designer (as you’ll see in today’s article). It’s a funny and eye opening experience. This is just one part of what Stephen is covering in his full-day UI19 workshop, Design Skills for Complex Understanding and Problem Solving on October 27. See how you can present data in compelling, contextually relevant formats in his workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Good interaction design is about attending to every moment that passes between a person and the device (or system, or service) with which he or she is interacting. These moments can be explicit, as with gestures, taps, a button-click, or the completion of a form field. Or, these moments may be more elusive, such as a pause while you try and understand what is being asked of you or how to answer. It’s these internal conversations that users have at any given moment that often get overlooked. Read the article: UX Design, Role-playing & Micromoments. What micro-moments have your experiences that added to — or diminished — your experience with a design?  Leave us a note...

8 Ways to Boost Your Team’s UX Skills

You need a conference that will enhance your team’s skills so they are ready to successfully overcome the next set of challenges you’ve set out for them. What makes UI19 unique are the workshops. The conference is dedicated to educating and inspiring the UX professional. With two days of  full-day workshops your team can divide and conquer across eight specific topics. We guarantee they’ll learn skills, processes, and techniques to immediately impact your team and company. Mobile design Luke Wroblewski Design process Leah Buley Service-design thinking Marc Stickdorn Content-first design Steph Hay User scenarios Kim Goodwin Designing with type Tim Brown Microinteractions Dan Saffer Data visualization Stephen Anderson ————————————————————————————————————————————————————————– You can’t afford NOT to send them. Take advantage of the team discount and register 4 or more people at $200 off per person. Register Your Team and...

UIEtips: The Dirty Dozen Roadmap Roadblocks

In this week’s UIEtips, we share an article from Bruce McCarthy. In it, Bruce defines the product roadmap and offers twelve areas where organizations break down when developing roadmaps. Best of all, he shares ideas on how to put all twelve roadblocks in your rearview mirror. Want to hear more from Bruce? He’s presenting our next virtual seminar on June 26, Lean Roadmapping: Where Product Management & UX Meet. Here’s an excerpt from the article: A good roadmap inspires. It inspires buy-in from executives, inspires confidence from customers and salespeople, and inspires development teams to produce the groundbreaking products that drive significant growth.  A good roadmap keeps your organization on course toward its destination. Stating what you will do and when makes it easy to judge when you fall behind schedule or get detoured by good ideas that just don’t fit your strategic vision. Read the article: The Dirty Dozen Roadmap Roadblocks. What roadblocks have challenged your organization in creating product roadmaps?  Leave us a note...

UIEtips: Customizing Help and Tips by Input Type

It’s not uncommon that an interaction for an app on a mobile device is completely different than a desktop. Could inline help be the answer to communicating the necessary action? It’s not so easy as that as Luke Wroblewski points out in this week’s UIEtips. You still have to surface the hidden interface. Thinking about mobile design first is Luke’s mantra and what he’ll focus on in his full day workshop at this year’s User Interface Conference, October 27-29 in Boston. Explore how Luke will shift your thinking beyond the desktop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: A common way to provide relevant bits of guidance inside an application is through inline help. Inline help is positioned where it’s most useful in an interface and made visible by default so people don’t have to do anything to reveal it. This makes it an effective way to tell people how to use an interface. But what happens when those instructions vary by input type. Read the article: Customizing Help and Tips by Input Type. How do you and your team create interfaces that work with different screen sizes and input types? Leave us a note...

UIEtips: Content and Design Are Inseparable Work Partners

It’s not uncommon within organizations that web site content is treated differently and separately from the web site design process. Yet the users do not separate the two and see it as one experience. When the content and design process are not done hand-in-hand, poor user experiences is often the result. Today’s article focuses on this issue. Tying together your content and design process is such an important issue that we’ve brought in Steph Hay to do a full day workshop on it at the UI19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29. Steph will show you how to map conversations as a first step to designing customer-centric user experiences.Learn more about Steph’s workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: It’s not news that the content is the important part of the design. For years, Karen McGrane has told us that working on the design without considering the content is like giving your best friend a beautifully wrapped empty box for their birthday. They’ll enjoy opening it, but will be sorely disappointed with the entirety results. And recently, Steph Hay reminded us that “content is the entire reason people come to the design in the first place.” The new thinking is that content creation and management cannot be a separate endeavor from design creation and management. That we need to inseparably integrate the two, structurally and organizationally, to create great experiences. Read the article: Content and Design are Inseparable Work Partners. What can your organization do to make design and content feel more integrated? Tell us about it...