Luke Wroblewski – Mobile as a Medium

[ Transcript Available ] “We have to go mobile”. It’s a prevalent phrase in many organizations these days. There’s a clear recognition that mobile is a “thing”. Oftentimes however, exactly what mobile is and the reasons for “going” there aren’t necessarily clear internally. Simply moving your current design to smaller screens or making it responsive without regard to content or context won’t cut it. There’s no better person to talk about the trends and direction of mobile than Luke Wroblewski. He’s consistently been at the forefront of the mobile design discussion. Through his books and his various talks, he’s advocated a mobile first approach, focusing on what is absolutely necessary and letting that inform the desktop design. Luke says it’s necessary to look at how your service or product is framed in the broader picture. Most are built upon tradition web structures, and then “mobilized” now that smartphone and tablet growth has exploded. He compares the difference between mobile and PC to that of television and radio. You wouldn’t just drop a radio program onto TV without optimizing it for that platform. The same should be considered for mobile as a medium. Attend a daylong workshop with Luke at UI19 Luke’s UI19 workshop, Mobile Design Essentials, in Boston October 29 will help you understand what’s happening with mobile in the world and how to go forward and apply it to the designs you do. Register with promotion code LUKECAST and get $300 off the current conference price. Explore Luke’s workshop   Recorded: May, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe...

UIEtips: Becoming a UX Unicorn in 5 Easy Steps

Lately there’s all this talk of UX unicorns. Have you found them? Are you trying to nurture them? Are you hoping to be one? Research shows there’s a strong correlation between UX Unicorns and the UX skills they acquire and hone.  Read about the five ways you can become a UX unicorn. Here’s an excerpt from the article: We call them unicorns because they are supposed to be mythical creatures-something that doesn’t exist in the real world. That’s how the nickname came about. Yet, over the past couple of years, we’ve started meeting people who fit the description of a UX unicorn. They are very real and they are amongst us. We know because we’ve met and studied several dozen of these multi-skilled designers over the past two years. Where do you begin to develop these skills? Well, one resource is UIE’s All You Can Learn, a library of all things UX. Just create your account, and over 160 seminars will be at your fingertips. Read the article Becoming a UX Unicorn in 5 Easy Steps. How do you branch out beyond your existing core skills? Tell us about it...

UIEtips: New Rule – Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2

In this week’s UIEtips, we offer part 2 of Josh Clark’s article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly. In it, Josh reminds us that ideally the web is a platform that can be accessed from any device, no matter what its input or output method. For now, that means opening up all desktop layouts for easy finger-tapping. Here’s an excerpt from the article: For most of its short history, web-design practice has focused on the visual-on screen size. It’s not yet in our industry’s DNA to consider physicality and environment in our layouts. That’s why many are still surprised at the idea that they can’t just use their legacy desktop layout on iPad, even though the screen size is the same. The layout looks good, sure, but that rarely means it’s also finger-friendly. The rise of the hybrids means touch is no longer the sole province of phones and tablets. It’s arrived on desktops and laptops, too. Most desktop website layouts, however, are not optimized for touch. They challenge our clumsy fingers and thumbs with small touch targets for links and menus, or they lean on hover interactions that can’t be triggered by touch at all. Few sites place primary navigation in easy reach of the thumb zone for either tablets or hybrids; they favor cursor-friendly screen-top navigation instead. Read the article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly, Part 2. If you want to convert your mouse-focused desktop sites into mobile layouts with touch-friendly screens, than watch Josh’s virtual seminar, Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces. It’s now part of UIE’s All You Can Learn, the place to watch, listen,...

UIEtips: New Rule – Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly

Josh Clark’s article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly reminds us that the web can be accessed from any device, regardless of its input or output method. For now, that means opening up all desktop layouts for easy finger-tapping. If you want to convert your mouse-focused desktop sites into mobile layouts with touch-friendly screens, then don’t miss Josh’s virtual seminar, Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces. It’s happening this Thursday, March 13, at 1:30pm ET. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Touch has landed on the desktop. A whole new category of touch devices is flooding the consumer market in coordination with the release of Windows 8: touchscreen laptops and tablet/keyboard combos. These new hybrid combinations of touch and keyboard create a new ergonomic environment… and fresh demands on designers. Like tablets before them, the ergonomics of these hybrid gizmos demand UI conventions that depart from desktop layouts of similar screen size. The hybrids not only need big touch targets to accommodate clumsy fingers, but they also need controls and navigation conveniently placed where hands naturally come to rest. Designing for touch introduces elements of industrial design: physical comfort and ease are critical considerations. Read the article New Rule: Every Desktop Design Has To Go Finger-Friendly. How do you design for touch-friendly interfaces? Tell us about it...

Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces

Josh Clark returns to the UIE Virtual Seminar program with his March 13 presentation, Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces.  If you want to convert your mouse-focused desktop sites into touch-friendly designs, then be sure to save your spot in Josh’s seminar. You’ll want to attend this seminar if you: Want to learn proper layout for primary controls, regardless of device Are designing for fingers—and especially thumbs—on multiple screen sizes Haven’t designed touch interfaces or need to evolve your existing ones Believe it or not, our webinars can sell out, and both of Josh’s previous presentations did exactly that.  So, act quickly and register for Designing Touch-Friendly Interfaces.        ...