Designing E.T.’s Experience: Interview with UX Week Speaker Doug Vakoch of SETI Institute

Better experiences come about from building empathy for our users, but what happens when that user is an extraterrestrial? At UX Week this September we’ll talk to the person who can answer this question and help us consider how solving this far-out problem can help us design and communicate better with our users here on earth. Dr. Doug Vakoch is the Director of Interstellar Message Composition at the SETI Institute, and he researches ways that different civilizations might create messages that could be transmitted across interstellar space, allowing communication between humans and extraterrestrials even without face-to-face contact. In our conversation, Doug lays out the design principles for communication with E.T., invalidates Hollywood plots, and tells us what he really hopes to communicate to extraterrestrials. — Brandon: Let’s jump right in—if an extraterrestrial civilization contacts us, do we communicate back? Doug: There are a lot of things that happen with the first time we detect a signal that looks like it might be from another civilization. The signals that we look for are very similar to the TV and radio signals that we create here on earth, so there’s a long process that could take weeks, even months, before we’re really sure that this is from another civilization. Then, if we do, it could be very hard to unpack any message that they might send to us. But all the while that we’re trying to figure out what they’re saying and whether this is, in fact, really a signal from ET, I think there will be a cacophony of replies from earth. While it’s debated in the United Nations and...

NUX Manchester – 4th August – UX is everyone’s responsibility

The next NUX Manchester event is taking place on Monday 4th August and will be in the usual place at the Code Computerlove office in City Centre Manchester. Start time is 7pm. UX IS EVERYONE’S RESPONSIBILITY with Tom Bradley (BBC Future Media) Tom is interested in helping teams solve problems or try new things using design thinking, creative facilitation and user research. He has been working with people from across the BBC to develop a ‘design sprints’ process that provides a framework to collaboratively explore and test ideas in a cost-effective way. Tom will share this process, demo the tools and explain how to overcome some of the challenges that crop up along the way. About Tom Bradley Tom is Executive Product Manager at, BBC Future Media (Knowledge & Learning). He’s worked at the BBC for 3 years, first as a Creative Director in Children’s, then later in Knowledge and Learning. He has recently moved to the role of Executive Product Manager, shaping the strategic direction for the department, and then creating an environment that brings people from all disciplines together to explore and define how this vision is delivered to the audience. Follow Tom: @TomBradley Tickets Get free tickets here: Event Registration Online for NUX Manchester – 4th August – UX is everyone's responsibility powered by Eventbrite How to find us View Larger...

Tim Brown – Helvetica is the Neue Black

[ Transcript Available ] When you break down written language, it’s really just a carefully crafted set of tiny symbols. It’s easy to dismiss these meticulous creations in daily life as simply, reading. The shape, readability, and size of these symbols are all factors in effectively communicating ideas, and have been for thousands of years. In essence, typography itself is more than just picking a font. Tim Brown works at Adobe Typekit. Tim says there is a certain level of complexity in good typography. There’s more to it than symbols and shapes or serif versus sans-serif. One of the more important aspects that affects communication is the spacing of these symbols. A well designed typeface creates a rhythm and balance in the words. This allows you to apply this balance to your typography and your design as a whole. Attend a daylong workshop with Tim at UI19   Tim’s UI19 workshop, Designing with Type, in Boston October 29 will show you how to choose and use type on the web, from serifs and superfamilies to counters and compositions. Register with promotion code TIMCAST and get $300 off the current conference price. Explore Tim’s workshop Recorded: May, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jared Spool: Hello, everyone. You are listening to, yet, another episode of Spoolcast and I am so excited, because we have someone new that we haven’t talked to before, Tim Brown. Tim works at Adobe Typekit. He is the brains behind the Typekit Practice system, which if you haven’t checked it...

Strengthen Your UX Skills with These Tools and Techniques

At the User Interface 19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29 you’ll learn new techniques and skills to make you a stronger UX Designer. Plus we’ll give you the tools to use at the conference and afterwards with a designer’s toolkit when you register by Thursday, July 3. Choose two workshops from these leaders Mobile design Luke Wroblewski Design process Leah Buley Service-design thinking Marc Stickdorn Content-first design Steph Hay User scenarios Kim Goodwin Designing with type Tim Brown Microinteractions Dan Saffer Data visualization Stephen Anderson   The tools to help you with your designs When you register by Thursday, July 3 you’ll get your own designer’s toolkit loaded with essential tools needed to make great designs. This kit will help you iterate and share your thoughts in physical form and capture all your awesome ideas during and after the conference. Sign up now to get your...

NUX Leeds, 28 August, Designing usable number entry interfaces

NUX Leeds returns with beer and pizza provided by our sponsors ebuyer and SimpleUsability from 6pm onwards and Sarah Wiseman’s talk at 6.30pm. For years research has been conducted in the field of text entry, and has led to some innovative designs for alphabetic text entry interfaces, but little attention has been paid to the way we enter numbers. Number entry is a highly pervasive task, whether it be entering our PIN at an ATM, or dialing a phone number to entering in financial data or medical information. Sarah Wiseman investigates number entry interfaces, and looks at the important aspects to consider when designing them. First, Sarah will cover the importance of getting number entry interfaces right, and will highlight examples of what happens when it goes wrong. Then she will talk about the aims of her research and what conclusions can be drawn from it. This will include design recommendations on implementing number entry interfaces with a UCD approach, including ways in which designers can reduce the number entry error rate for users. She will explain the cognitive theory behind number entry, and how this compares to what we know about text entry. Running order 6:00 – 6:30 Pizza & refreshments, provided by our sponsors ebuyer and SimpleUsability 6:30 – 7:30 Sarah Wiseman will talk about designing number entry interfaces 7:30 – 8:00 Open discussion and networking Free tickets Get free tickets here: Online event registration for NUX Leeds, 28 August, Designing usable number entry interfaces powered by Eventbrite Venue NUX Leeds will take place at the new SimpleUsability offices at Marshalls Mill. ebuyer are providing pizza for this event, while SimpleUsability are providing beer and...