NUX3 – UX & Design Conference – 10th Nov 2014

Royal Northern Collage of Music, Manchester ~ 10th Nov 2014 ~ 9.00am-5.30pm NUX3 is an all-day event in Manchester focussed on how an understanding of people can help you define, design, and build better experiences, on the web and beyond. With international speakers from some of the biggest digital brands, the day will provide a...

Bruce McCarthy – Product Management Meets UX

[ Transcript Available ] Product roadmaps are a useful tool for managers and the development they oversee. Usability testing and research informs user experience decisions. Both of these goals, in the end, benefit the users. So why can’t your process contribute to both of these goals? Bruce McCarthy, through his years of experience, has developed a methodology to get the product and UX teams working in concert. Using clickable prototypes and mockups lets the product team prioritize their roadmap and the UX team get early feedback. This creates an environment to inform the design without committing a lot of time and resources to it. With both teams validating their assumptions you can arrive at the right path faster. Bruce received a lot of questions during his seminar, Lean Roadmapping: Where Product Management and UX Meet. He joins Adam Churchill to address some of those in this podcast. How do you handle disagreements on what should be prioritized? Should you have separate road maps for product development and higher level management? When is it ok to use a lower fidelity prototype? How do you find interview participants for your research? What approach do you take to sifting through the data you collect? How can you be confident when showing the design to only a small number of people? How does this process apply to a more mature product versus an MVP? Recorded: July, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Welcome, everyone, to the SpoolCast. A few weeks ago, Bruce McCarthy presented a...

Ben Callahan – Responsive Workflows: There’s No Perfect Process

[ Transcript Available ] The web is everywhere. It’s on our desks, in our pockets, and on screens of all sizes. The complexity involved with building a website grows with each new device it must support. This cross-platform consistency requirement makes a concrete, static design process unsustainable. As flexible and responsive as the sites we’re building have to be, so too does our process for building them. In his virtual seminar, Responsive Workflows: Because There’s No Such Thing as a Perfect Process, Ben Callahan explains that there is no one way to produce a website. He believes that team managers need create an environment where a fluid process can exist and be nurtured. Ben received many questions from our audience during the live seminar. He joins Adam Churchill to tackle some of those in this podcast. What concerns do organizations have when you present this process? What tools are utilized in responsive workflows? How do you keep the team on the same page? What is a content priority guide? How does business strategy tie into a responsive workflow? Recorded: July, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Hey, everyone. Welcome to the SpoolCast. A little while ago, Ben Callahan presented a great virtual seminar for us on responsive workflows. Now, there’s over 175 UX seminars like Ben’s that are part of UIE’s All You Can Learn, if you want to get a hold of this presentation. In today’s podcast, Ben is coming back, and he’s joining us to discuss some of the...

UIEtips: UX Strategy Blueprint

In this week’s UIEtips, Jim Kalbach defines and discusses how to consistently create a UX strategy. Here he shares a tool with you for doing so at your organization—the UX Strategy Blueprint. If your strategy discussions feel more like political battles than progressive team-building, pay attention to Jim Kalbach. His virtual seminar on Thursday, August 28 is all about Defining a UX Design Strategy. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Analysis and planning, while necessary inputs and outputs in the strategy creation process, are not the core of strategy. You can’t analyze your way to strategy: the answers don’t magically emerge from data. And detailed roadmaps don’t provide the rationale for the activity they organize. Strategy does. It connects analysis and planning with an intentional logic that guides decision making. Read the article: UX Strategy Blueprint. Do you have a UX Strategy Blueprint to define your UX strategy? Leave us a note...

Sarah Horton and Steve Faulkner – HTML5 Accessibility

[ Transcript Available ] Web accessibility takes place on a foundation of technologies, the most common of which are developed and maintained by the Worldwide Web Consortium, or W3C. Its success is dependent on how well these underlying technologies support accessible user experiences. Fortunately for us, people like Steve Faulkner devote much of their time to ensure technology specifications, such as HTML5, include the hooks that make it possible to build an accessible and enjoyable user experience for everyone. Including people who use assistive technologies, such as screen reader and screen magnification software, and different display and interaction modalities, such as user stylesheets and keyboard navigation. The web was created with accessibility as part its framework. Steve’s focus is to ensure accessibility remains a fundamental component of the web’s foundational technologies. Steve is co-editor of the HTML5 specification. He has been closely involved in other W3C specifications development, including the Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA) specification. In this podcast Steve joins Sarah Horton to tell us about: The current status of the HTML5 specification How WAI-ARIA and HTML5 work together to support accessibility How accessibility is integrated into specification development What it’s like to work on a W3C specification Steve Faulkner has been working in accessibility since 2001, first with Vision Australia and currently with The Paciello Group (TPG), where he is Principal Accessibility Engineer. He is involved with several W3C working groups, including the HTML Working Group and the Protocols and Formats Working Group, and is author of the helpful resource, Techniques for providing useful text alternatives. He is also creator and lead developer of the Web Accessibility...