UIEtips: How Agile UX Can Be a Cost Effective Approach

In this week’s UIEtips, we reprint an article from Jared Spool. In it, he shares ideas on getting low-cost iterations into your Agile development process. Jared also makes the case that UX-focused design is a team sport. If you’re looking for more on tying UX design and your Agile process together, then you’re going to want to join us on September 18, when Aviva Rosenstein presents our next virtual seminar, Making UX Work with Agile Scrum Teams. Here’s an excerpt from the article: It’s tempting to let those UX-focused design team members do this early work while the rest of the team goes off and does other activities. However, the biggest value from these early iterations comes from the discussions and insights that emerge. The most successful teams involve everyone who will influence the eventual design—including developers and stakeholders—in their design studios and paper prototyping activities. Read the article: Cost Effective Approaches to Iteration in Agile UX. What techniques are you using to reduce the costs of iteration for your team? Leave us a note...

Improving the Critique and Design Process

Giving critique is not an easy task. Doing it constructively and effectively without hurting someone’s feelings or coming off as cruel and inflexible is difficult. Being able to successfully critique and create design studios is so important we’ve dedicated many articles and podcasts to the topic, along with a full-day workshop. In this post, we’ve listed out some great free articles and podcasts on this topic. But you can really dive in deep at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. In Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry workshop Building Consensus in Critiques and Design Studios, you’ll learn how to organize energizing workshops that rally your teams to explore designs and achieve the best possible results. You’ll discover how to reach consensus, improve the conversations you have around design, and create open feedback loops your teams will actually use. Here’s some reading about design studios and critique Building a Cohesive Design Team – Jared M. Spool Jared discusses team characteristics that lead to successful designs. Goods, Bads, and Dailies: Lessons for Conducting Great Critiques – Jared M. Spool Jared explains how child magicians and Pixar Media have mastered critique and how you can incorporate this into your design process. Collaboration through the Design Studio: An Interview with Adam Connor and Aaron IrizarryJared M. Spool Jared interviews Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry on using a design studio as a process to improve team communication and achieve design goals. Design Studio Workshop: Adding up the Benefits – Jared M. Spool Jared explains how a design studio workshop can help your team work through various design challenges and the...

Adam Connor – Design Studio: Building Consensus Early in Your Design Process

[ Transcript Available ] Getting two people to agree on something is a difficult task in any aspect of life. Getting a whole team to agree on a design, where underlying feelings, ownership, and organizational hierarchy are involved, can be an even greater challenge. That’s not even counting the dreaded “swoop and poop” scenario. The trick is to get everyone involved early in the design process and a design studio is a perfect tool for just that. Adam Connor of Mad*Pow deals a lot with critique sessions and design studios. Adam knows the value of getting the entire team and stakeholders together in a collaborative environment to sketch and share ideas. In his virtual seminar Design Studio: Building Consensus Early in Your Design Process, Adam outlined his process for running a studio and offer tips to aid in gaining consensus. A bunch of great questions were asked during the live seminar and in this podcast Adam joins Adam Churchill of UIE to address some of them including, How do you run a design studio with remote members of a team? What’s the appropriate structure of a studio, time-wise, to make it worthwhile? Who do you involve in a studio? Is the facilitator someone on the design team, and are they actively involved in the studio? How do you manage difficult participants? In addition to his virtual seminar, Adam will be presenting his thinking on design studio and critique along with Aaron Irizarry in a daylong workshop at the User Interface 18 conference, October 21-23 in Boston. For more information you can check out Adam and Aaron’s previous podcast, or...

Adam Connor & Aaron Irizarry – Building Consensus in Critiques and Design Studios

[ Transcript Available ] Critique is often confused with being negative and critical. However, the basis of critique is communication. Having strongly grounded communication is necessary for any relationship in life, work related or not. Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry believe that critique is not just a design-centered skill that exists to make sure you’re doing things “right”. Instead, they see it as a living and breathing process of analysis and adjustment. Simply saying, “I don’t like blue” is not a helpful way to critique a design. Instead, they suggest framing it for better understanding of what objectives were trying to be met and what problems they were approaching in order to better iterate on the design. Adam and Aaron will be presenting one of the 8 daylong workshops at the User Interface 18 conference, October 21-23 in Boston. for more information visit, uiconf.com. Recorded: June, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jared Spool: Welcome, everyone, to yet another episode of the SpoolCast. We have done a ton of these. They’ve all been fun, but today is going to be the most fun because we have Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry joining us. You may not know this, but they’re doing a full-day workshop at the User Interface 18 conference called “Building Consensus in Critique and Design Studios.” Today, we’re going to talk about critique and design studios and consensus and teamwork. I’m really excited about that. Hey, Adam. Hey, Aaron. How are you guys? Adam Connor: Doing good. Aaron Irizarry: Good, thanks....