UIEtips: Content and Design Are Inseparable Work Partners

It’s not uncommon within organizations that web site content is treated differently and separately from the web site design process. Yet the users do not separate the two and see it as one experience. When the content and design process are not done hand-in-hand, poor user experiences is often the result. Today’s article focuses on this issue. Tying together your content and design process is such an important issue that we’ve brought in Steph Hay to do a full day workshop on it at the UI19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29. Steph will show you how to map conversations as a first step to designing customer-centric user experiences.Learn more about Steph’s workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: It’s not news that the content is the important part of the design. For years, Karen McGrane has told us that working on the design without considering the content is like giving your best friend a beautifully wrapped empty box for their birthday. They’ll enjoy opening it, but will be sorely disappointed with the entirety results. And recently, Steph Hay reminded us that “content is the entire reason people come to the design in the first place.” The new thinking is that content creation and management cannot be a separate endeavor from design creation and management. That we need to inseparably integrate the two, structurally and organizationally, to create great experiences. Read the article: Content and Design are Inseparable Work Partners. What can your organization do to make design and content feel more integrated? Tell us about it...

Luke Wroblewski – Mobile as a Medium

[ Transcript Available ] “We have to go mobile”. It’s a prevalent phrase in many organizations these days. There’s a clear recognition that mobile is a “thing”. Oftentimes however, exactly what mobile is and the reasons for “going” there aren’t necessarily clear internally. Simply moving your current design to smaller screens or making it responsive without regard to content or context won’t cut it. There’s no better person to talk about the trends and direction of mobile than Luke Wroblewski. He’s consistently been at the forefront of the mobile design discussion. Through his books and his various talks, he’s advocated a mobile first approach, focusing on what is absolutely necessary and letting that inform the desktop design. Luke says it’s necessary to look at how your service or product is framed in the broader picture. Most are built upon tradition web structures, and then “mobilized” now that smartphone and tablet growth has exploded. He compares the difference between mobile and PC to that of television and radio. You wouldn’t just drop a radio program onto TV without optimizing it for that platform. The same should be considered for mobile as a medium. Attend a daylong workshop with Luke at UI19 Luke’s UI19 workshop, Mobile Design Essentials, in Boston October 29 will help you understand what’s happening with mobile in the world and how to go forward and apply it to the designs you do. Register with promotion code LUKECAST and get $300 off the current conference price. Explore Luke’s workshop   Recorded: May, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe...

3 Easy Steps to Become a Better Designer

Strengthening your design skills at the UI19 Conference begins with these three simple steps: Review the UI19 conference web site to see what we have planned for you. Pick the two daylong workshops you most want to attend. Choose from eight amazing workshops. Register now to save money and guarantee your spot before UI19 sells out.   “Both the workshops and speeches were extremely useful and inspiring. The whole experience was beyond my (high) expectations!” - Juha Rouvinen   See and Hear What the User Interface Conference Is All...

UIEtips: Dissecting Design – Part 2

In this week’s UIEtips, we offer part two of Ben Callahan’s article, Dissecting Design. In it, he explores which tools are the most helpful for different parts of the design process. Ben was one of our top speakers at this year’s UX Immersion Mobile Conference and we’re pleased to have him back for our next virtual seminar on June 5, Responsive Workflows: Because There’s No Such Thing as a Perfect Process. Here’s an excerpt from the article: I believe many people in our industry struggle with “design in the browser” simply because they aren’t fluent with the tools needed for working that way. I’ve heard many people say, “Happy accidents don’t happen in code like they do in PhotoShop.” I can testify that this is absolutely not true. Instead, I believe it’s about where you are the most fluent. As we evaluate the best tools for the monumental task of problem solving in design, I keep coming back to the ideal of fluency as a solid principle on which to base the decision. You can’t write poetry in a language you don’t speak. Similarly, you can’t craft design using tools you’re not fluent with. Read part two of the article here. Missed part one? Read it here. What tools do you and your team find most efficient and effective in solving design problems?  Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Dissecting Design – Part 1

In this week’s UIEtips, Ben Callahan dissects the design process to explore which tools are the most helpful for different parts of the process. Ben was one of our top speakers at this year’s UX Immersion Conference, and he’s also presenting our next virtual seminar on June 5, Responsive Workflows: Because There’s No Such Thing as a Perfect Process. Here’s an excerpt from the article: In the past few years, we’ve recognized the danger in jumping headfirst into full-comp design before we really understand the design direction. Other disciplines have recognized this for a long time-think mood boards in branding-and taken steps to ramp up their design effort. The goal here is to establish the basic building blocks we’ll use in the rest of the design process: things like color, type, texture, illustration style, photography treatment, iconography. Once these are established, the success rate for the rest of the process is greatly increased. There are a number of ways to do this on the web; let’s look at a few. Read part one of the two part article: Dissecting Design. How does your team handle design? Leave us a note...