3 Easy Steps to Become a Better Designer

Strengthening your design skills at the UI19 Conference begins with these three simple steps: Review the UI19 conference web site to see what we have planned for you. Pick the two daylong workshops you most want to attend. Choose from eight amazing workshops. Register now to save money and guarantee your spot before UI19 sells out.   “Both the workshops and speeches were extremely useful and inspiring. The whole experience was beyond my (high) expectations!” - Juha Rouvinen   See and Hear What the User Interface Conference Is All...

UIEtips: Dissecting Design – Part 1

In this week’s UIEtips, Ben Callahan dissects the design process to explore which tools are the most helpful for different parts of the process. Ben was one of our top speakers at this year’s UX Immersion Conference, and he’s also presenting our next virtual seminar on June 5, Responsive Workflows: Because There’s No Such Thing as a Perfect Process. Here’s an excerpt from the article: In the past few years, we’ve recognized the danger in jumping headfirst into full-comp design before we really understand the design direction. Other disciplines have recognized this for a long time-think mood boards in branding-and taken steps to ramp up their design effort. The goal here is to establish the basic building blocks we’ll use in the rest of the design process: things like color, type, texture, illustration style, photography treatment, iconography. Once these are established, the success rate for the rest of the process is greatly increased. There are a number of ways to do this on the web; let’s look at a few. Read part one of the two part article: Dissecting Design. How does your team handle design? Leave us a note...

Register for UI19 by May 15 to Secure the Lowest Rate

Take advantage of the $1,395 Rate – Register by May 15 Save money and guarantee your spot in the workshops of your choice. Register for the User Interface 19 Conference, October 27–29, in Boston at the lowest rate of $1,395 by May 15. “Both the workshops and speeches were extremely useful and inspiring. The whole experience was beyond my (high) expectations!” - Juha Rouvinen Your UI19 Registration Includes: Immediate access to UIE’s All You Can Learn for one year. This resource includes virtual seminars from many of the UI19 workshop leaders plus past conference recordings Two daylong workshops and a day of featured talks from the workshop presenters Complete conference materials from all the workshops and talks Access to video recordings of the featured talks through All You Can Learn A designer’s toolkit to help you create and communicate your design ideas Save your spot, guarantee your workshops, and get the lowest price when you sign-up by May 15. Register...

Whitney Quesenbery and Lainey Feingold – Structured Negotiations

[ Transcript Available ] If you work in user experience or accessibility, you probably spend part of your time on advocacy–making the case for a new design idea or a new way of working. Lawsuits are the ultimate way to get two sides to come to an agreement, but it’s also an extremely confrontational style of advocacy. A more collaborative process might be a better way to reach your goal with an agreement that is a win for everyone. Lainey Feingold is a disability rights lawyer with an extraordinary record of landmark cases, including settlements with some big companies that have made their sites more accessible. She’s done all this using Structured Negotiations, a process that lets a group of people work together to find a solution to a problem. It takes active patience, flexibility, grounded optimism, confidence, trust, and a empathy to be successful at Structured Negotiations. Lainey joins Whitney Quesenbery for this episode of A Podcast for Everyone to answer questions about this new way of reaching agreements. What are Structured Negotiations? Why are they more effective than lawsuits? How can you used the concepts in structured negotiations for UX advocacy? What are the characteristics of a good negotiator? Resources mentioned in this podcast. Law Office of Lainey Feingold About Structured Negotiations Examples of Web Accessibility Settlements Recorded: March, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Whitney Quesenbery: Hi. I’m Whitney Quesenbery, and I’m co-author with Sarah Horton of “A Web for Everyone for Rosenfeld Media.” Today, I’m talking to Lainey Feingold....

UIEtips: Why Lean UX?

In today’s UIEtips, we reprint an article on the debate and discussion surrounding Lean UX. Some have seen it as a condemnation of extensive documentation while others have said it’s a rebranding of techniques they’ve been practicing for years. In this excerpt from Lean UX: Applying Lean Principles to Improve User Experience, authors Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden lay out their rationale for why Lean UX is something new and why it’s important now. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Working in software, designers faced new challenges. We had to figure out the grammar of this new medium, and as we did, we saw new specialties such as interaction design and information architecture emerge. But the process by which designers practiced remained largely unchanged. We still designed products in great detail in advance, because we still had to deal with a “manufacturing” process: our work had to be duplicated onto floppy disks and CDs, which were then distributed to market in exactly the same way that physical goods were distributed. The cost of getting it wrong remained high. Read the article Why Lean UX?. If you want a learning-focused process that rallies your entire team around continuous research-and more effective design outcomes-then join us for Josh Seiden’s April 3 virtual seminar, Lean UX: Forming & Testing Hypotheses. How have you implemented Lean UX in your organization?  Tell us about it...