Get yours now — 13 hours of recordings from the UI18 Conference

UI18 OnDemand gets you front row access to 10 UX experts sharing best practices and cutting edge techniques on advanced design processes, flexible team-based techniques, and meaningful data display. Recordings include: Stephen Anderson – Help Users Decide Is your phone bill easy or enjoyable to read? Help users make decisions more easily by displaying your information in highly visual, interactive, and meaningful ways. Kim Goodwin – Get More from User Research Think you don’t have time for user research? Once you see the tools and techniques Kim uses to quickly gather customer insights and prioritize designs, you’ll change your mind. Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry – Discuss Design without Losing Your Mind Overcome the endless barrage of opinions that thwart your design progress. Get the techniques to make critique a positive experience for everyone involved. Scott Berkun – Do Great Work from Anywhere How can WordPress be effective when its entire team works remotely? Managers, designers, and developers all thrive in its autonomous environment — hear why. Kevin Hoffman – Hold Meetings That Aren’t Excruciating Enjoy your meetings by applying the same design thinking that UX pros already know and love. Get real work done and build consensus, regardless of personalities and opinions. Dan Saffer – Dig into Tiny Design Details The difference between a product we love and one we only tolerate often lies in these details. Turn your product’s dull microinteractions into memorable, engaging moments. Jeff Gothelf – Axe Requirements-driven Product Design Start spending your time on the right work for your business by creating a series of hypotheses. Then, run experiments to validate which solutions are...

Brian Suda – Data Visualizations that Pack a Punch

[ Transcript Available ] Creating visualizations from data can be a powerful and intriguing way to present findings. But way too many design teams sit on vast amounts of data. They also spend entirely too much time making static images rather than interactive tools. In his virtual seminar, Data Visualizations that Pack a Punch, Brian Suda outlines different types of meaningful data visualizations, from charts and graphs to more interactive models. He also discusses the importance of using the right tools and newer technologies and higher resolution displays as they emerge. The audience asked a slew of great questions during the live event. Brian comes back to chat with Adam Churchill and tackle some of those questions in this podcast. How do you approach accessibility challenges, such as color blindness? How do you communicate that the data you’re presenting is “fresh”? Is there a good way to demonstrate the ROI of good visualizations? What can you do to encourage people to start exploring and using data? Are there any examples of companies currently using visualizations well? Should you try to do this in-house or is it better to outsource to an agency? What is the best way to get started? Recorded: August, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Hello, everyone. Welcome to another edition of the SpoolCast. Recently Brian Suda joined us to present his awesome virtual seminar “Data Visualizations that Pack a Punch.” Brian’s seminar, along with 110 others that teach the tools and techniques you need to create great...

UIETips: The Top 20 Data Visualization Tools

In this article, Brian Suda dives into 20 different tools for creating simple to complex visualizations. Part of making great visualizations is lots of practice. But you also have to think about the life of your visualizations, which tool is best to address your need, and where coding can save some time. Brian covers all this in the next UIE Virtual Seminar, Data Visualizations That Pack a Punch on August 22, 2013. Here’s an excerpt from the article: One of the most common questions I get asked is how to get started with data visualizations. Beyond following blogs, you need to practise – and to practise, you need to understand the tools available. In this article, I want to introduce you to 20 different tools for creating visualizations: from simple charts to complex graphs, maps and infographics. Almost everything here is available for free, and some you have probably installed already. Read the article: The Top 20 Data Visualization Tools Have you created some amazing visualizations? What tools did you use? Share them with us...

Wrestling with Big Data? Join us for Data Visualizations that Pack a Punch

Later this month, Brian Suda presents our next virtual seminar, Data Visualizations that Pack a Punch and will show you just how powerful great data visualizations can be! Brian’s work with companies such as PriceWaterhouseCoopers is defining just how powerful great data visualizations can be—especially when they’re tied to marketing or social-media campaigns aimed at raising awareness, conveying meaning, and getting users to interact. You’ll want to attend this seminar if you: Work for a company that sits on vast amounts of data—but spends entirely too much time making static images rather than interactive tools Want to learn some tools and coding techniques for creating data visualizations that are the opposite of boring Have mapped data or created visualizations that aren’t being looked at, used, or appreciated Learn more about Brian’s August 22...

Stephen Anderson – Displaying Data in Digestible Ways

[ Transcript Available ] Culling through massive amounts of data is a headache. A dense table of aggregated data points can be useful in theory, but the manner in which it’s displayed is often a hindrance. Even more than that, showing that data in a chart or graph is confusing if it’s not effectively labeled. Data is useless when you can’t make good decisions from it. Stephen Anderson is a leading thinker on design and psychology. He spends lots of time thinking about how to visualize information and uses the travel site Hipmunk as an example of a good data visualization. All the flights are listed with clear visuals; length of the flights, layovers, and times. They even let you sort the results by “agony”. But ultimately, from a cognitive standpoint, displaying the flight data in this way creates less of a burden on your short term memory and makes for an easy comparison. Many times it comes down to taking a step back and really thinking about how data is displayed. It’s very easy to fall into placing something into a grid, table, or other familiar pattern because of what’s been done in the past. By really analyzing what kind of data you have and what you’re trying to communicate, you can uncover better ways to present that data. Stephen will be presenting one of 8 daylong workshops at the User Interface 18 conference, October 21-23 in Boston. For more information, visit uiconf.com. Recorded: June, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jared...