UIEtips: Setting the Foundation for Meaningful Critiques – Goals, Principles, Personas and Scenarios

Doing critiques well and constructively is no easy task. Often designers feel picked on or that the feedback doesn’t give enough direction. According to Adam Connor, a key concept to remember is that “critique is a form of analysis”. It’s a discussion on what is working well and what areas need improvement. To do this right you need goals. You need to ask if what you’re critiquing is reaching the objectives of the goals you and your team created. In today’s article by Adam Connor, Adam discusses how to set the foundation of a meaningful critique by using goals, principles, personas, and scenarios. In less than two weeks, Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry will lead a full-day workshop at the User Interface 18 Conference in Boston. Their workshop, Building Consensus in Critiques and Designs Studios will show you how to execute a productive design studio. You’ll follow a proven framework that goes from ideation to consensus-building. Learn more about their workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: In a recent post, Aaron talked about the importance of intent in the success of critique. Without the right intent on both sides critiques can go nowhere. Or worse, they can hurt the design, the designer and the relationship between the designer and the critics. But now lets say that the intent is right. The critics are looking to help the designer understand the impact of the decisions he or she has made. The designer has every intention of listening, of critiquing right along with the critics, and using what they learn to iterate and improve upon their design. There is still...

Improving the Critique and Design Process

Giving critique is not an easy task. Doing it constructively and effectively without hurting someone’s feelings or coming off as cruel and inflexible is difficult. Being able to successfully critique and create design studios is so important we’ve dedicated many articles and podcasts to the topic, along with a full-day workshop. In this post, we’ve listed out some great free articles and podcasts on this topic. But you can really dive in deep at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. In Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry workshop Building Consensus in Critiques and Design Studios, you’ll learn how to organize energizing workshops that rally your teams to explore designs and achieve the best possible results. You’ll discover how to reach consensus, improve the conversations you have around design, and create open feedback loops your teams will actually use. Here’s some reading about design studios and critique Building a Cohesive Design Team – Jared M. Spool Jared discusses team characteristics that lead to successful designs. Goods, Bads, and Dailies: Lessons for Conducting Great Critiques – Jared M. Spool Jared explains how child magicians and Pixar Media have mastered critique and how you can incorporate this into your design process. Collaboration through the Design Studio: An Interview with Adam Connor and Aaron IrizarryJared M. Spool Jared interviews Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry on using a design studio as a process to improve team communication and achieve design goals. Design Studio Workshop: Adding up the Benefits – Jared M. Spool Jared explains how a design studio workshop can help your team work through various design challenges and the...

Adam Connor – Design Studio: Building Consensus Early in Your Design Process

[ Transcript Available ] Getting two people to agree on something is a difficult task in any aspect of life. Getting a whole team to agree on a design, where underlying feelings, ownership, and organizational hierarchy are involved, can be an even greater challenge. That’s not even counting the dreaded “swoop and poop” scenario. The trick is to get everyone involved early in the design process and a design studio is a perfect tool for just that. Adam Connor of Mad*Pow deals a lot with critique sessions and design studios. Adam knows the value of getting the entire team and stakeholders together in a collaborative environment to sketch and share ideas. In his virtual seminar Design Studio: Building Consensus Early in Your Design Process, Adam outlined his process for running a studio and offer tips to aid in gaining consensus. A bunch of great questions were asked during the live seminar and in this podcast Adam joins Adam Churchill of UIE to address some of them including, How do you run a design studio with remote members of a team? What’s the appropriate structure of a studio, time-wise, to make it worthwhile? Who do you involve in a studio? Is the facilitator someone on the design team, and are they actively involved in the studio? How do you manage difficult participants? In addition to his virtual seminar, Adam will be presenting his thinking on design studio and critique along with Aaron Irizarry in a daylong workshop at the User Interface 18 conference, October 21-23 in Boston. For more information you can check out Adam and Aaron’s previous podcast, or...

UIETips: Goods, Bads, and Dailies – Lessons for Conducting Great Critiques

  Critique is a critical role in the design process but often it’s not done in a productive manner. In this article, I explores critique techniques and discusses four important roles of the process. Design studios and critiques are so instrumental in the design processes that we’ve included it as a one day workshop at the User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23. In Adam Connor and Aaaron Irizarry’s workshop, Building Consensus in Critiques and Design Studios, you’ll learn how to become better at conducting your own critiques in order to become better at problem solving and design. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Giving the presenter a chance to show their work without being interrupted by a string of questions turns out to be pretty important. After seeing the Chosen Ones in action, I immediately noticed how, in my design reviews, disruptive interruptions can be. It throws the presenter off and doesn’t give them a chance to tell their story about the design and what they’re trying to accomplish. There are four roles in any critique session. The two everyone’s most familiar with are the presenter and the audience (also sometimes called the critics). However, every session also needs a facilitator and a recorder. Read the article: Goods, Bads, and Dailies: Lessons for Conducting Great Critiques Have you given out some great critiques? Share them with us...

Adam Connor & Aaron Irizarry – Building Consensus in Critiques and Design Studios

[ Transcript Available ] Critique is often confused with being negative and critical. However, the basis of critique is communication. Having strongly grounded communication is necessary for any relationship in life, work related or not. Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry believe that critique is not just a design-centered skill that exists to make sure you’re doing things “right”. Instead, they see it as a living and breathing process of analysis and adjustment. Simply saying, “I don’t like blue” is not a helpful way to critique a design. Instead, they suggest framing it for better understanding of what objectives were trying to be met and what problems they were approaching in order to better iterate on the design. Adam and Aaron will be presenting one of the 8 daylong workshops at the User Interface 18 conference, October 21-23 in Boston. for more information visit, uiconf.com. Recorded: June, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jared Spool: Welcome, everyone, to yet another episode of the SpoolCast. We have done a ton of these. They’ve all been fun, but today is going to be the most fun because we have Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry joining us. You may not know this, but they’re doing a full-day workshop at the User Interface 18 conference called “Building Consensus in Critique and Design Studios.” Today, we’re going to talk about critique and design studios and consensus and teamwork. I’m really excited about that. Hey, Adam. Hey, Aaron. How are you guys? Adam Connor: Doing good. Aaron Irizarry: Good, thanks....