Whitney Quesenbery and Joe O’Connor – Accessible WordPress

[ Transcript Available ] WordPress powers over 25 million sites with more than 14 billion pages viewed each month, making it one of the most popular web publishing platforms. Imagine if every one of those sites was accessible. Joe O’Connor has been a leader in making that happen, through the WordPress accessibility team which works from the inside to make WordPress into a web publishing platform for everyone. Joe joins Whitney Quesenbery for this episode of A Podcast for Everyone to talk about what it takes to make an open source platform that can help authors make their sites accessible. They talked about: How can you make your WordPress accessible? What are the best accessible-ready WordPress themes? What tools can help you keep your content accessible for everyone? Joseph Karr O’Connor lives in Santa Monica, California. When Section 508 came into effect in 1999 he began leading Accessible UX teams creating accessible web environments. Joe has been using WordPress in support of non-profits, research, and university news since 2005. Now leading Cities, a world-wide effort to build free accessible WordPress themes, Joe also contributes to Make WordPress Accessible and asks you to get involved. He’s known on Twitter as AccessibleJoe. Resources mentioned in this podcast WordPress Guidelines: Accessibility Accessibility-Ready WordPress Themes Making WordPress Accessible WP Accessibility plugin by Joe Dolson The Cities project Accessibility checking tools Accessible WordPress themes that Joe recommends: Blaskan Simone WordPress Twenty Fourteen WordPress Twenty Thirteen Recorded: July, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Whitney Quesenbery: Hi, I’m Whitney...

Content-First UX Design: What Video Games Teach Us about UX, Our July 17 Virtual Seminar

Great UX design influences one video game becoming a cultural icon while another lands in the $5 bin at GameStop. So what cues can we take from these popular games—and from this technology-driven industry that so closely parallels our own? In her July 17 virtual seminar, Steph is going to teach us about two: Content-First UX Design and Contextual Learning. Attend this seminar, especially if you: Think “content before design” is a pipe dream Want a fresh-but-practical approach to designing for engagement Are looking for low-cost, low-fidelity ways to design faster Play video games Don’t play video games Make this seminar the first of 9 for your team by by registering for our 6 Month Program. Pay once, save your spot in all 9 UIE Virtual seminars from July –...

Steph Hay – Content-first User Experience

[ Transcript Available ] In traditional website design and development it’s common to start with the design and add your content later in the process. You may even use “lorem ipsum” as a placeholder to know where the content eventually needs to live. This causes the content creator to craft words to fit the design instead of building a design to fit the content. Without the right content your users will likely have a lackluster experience no matter how good-looking the design. Steph Hay is an advocate for a content-first approach. She believes it’s important to start with a simple document with all of the content that will be used to communicate with the user. By starting with a document, in plain language, as opposed to a wireframe or comp, all the stakeholders can have an informed discussion. No one needs to be educated on what they are looking at. Starting with the content helps focus the message you’re delivering to your users. When you build the design out from there, you can more easily determine where the appropriate places are for each type of communication. The site map and hierarchy are born out of the real content that will exist in the final product. You end up with a more cohesive and clear experience. Attend a daylong workshop with Steph at UI19 Steph’s UI19 workshop, Content-First UX Design, in Boston October 27 will show how to create more compelling products by first mapping the conversation you want to have with customers, then designing around it. Register with promotion code STEPHCAST and get $300 off the current conference price....

UIEtips: Content and Design Are Inseparable Work Partners

It’s not uncommon within organizations that web site content is treated differently and separately from the web site design process. Yet the users do not separate the two and see it as one experience. When the content and design process are not done hand-in-hand, poor user experiences is often the result. Today’s article focuses on this issue. Tying together your content and design process is such an important issue that we’ve brought in Steph Hay to do a full day workshop on it at the UI19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29. Steph will show you how to map conversations as a first step to designing customer-centric user experiences.Learn more about Steph’s workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: It’s not news that the content is the important part of the design. For years, Karen McGrane has told us that working on the design without considering the content is like giving your best friend a beautifully wrapped empty box for their birthday. They’ll enjoy opening it, but will be sorely disappointed with the entirety results. And recently, Steph Hay reminded us that “content is the entire reason people come to the design in the first place.” The new thinking is that content creation and management cannot be a separate endeavor from design creation and management. That we need to inseparably integrate the two, structurally and organizationally, to create great experiences. Read the article: Content and Design are Inseparable Work Partners. What can your organization do to make design and content feel more integrated? Tell us about it...

Ahava Leibtag – Content: Messaging and Marketing

[ Transcript Available ] The goal of any site is to have great, compelling content. But what constitutes great content? How is the success of a blog post or a video measured? How can you be sure the time and effort put into crafting your content is providing an adequate return on investment? Ahava Leibtag believes that content is a conversation in a marketplace. In her virtual seminar, Designing Effective Content Marketing, Ahava discusses the challenges that organizations face when approaching content that not only dictates the user experience but also influences the bottom line. The audience asked some great questions during the live seminar and Ahava joins Adam Churchill to address some of those in this podcast. What are the most important channels to create content for and how do you prioritize? What if your content isn’t the type to “attract and acquire”? How do you handle content that may be technical or considered boring? How do you sort out the challenge of being responsible for multiple touch points? What are the signs that your content is no longer relevant or isn’t evergreen? When is the right time to bring the UX team into the content conversation? Recorded: March, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Hello, everyone, welcome to another edition of the Spoolcast. Earlier this year, Ahava Leibtag joined us to present her virtual seminar, “Designing Effective Content Marketing.” Ahava’s seminar, along with over 120 others, are now part of UIE’s “All You Can Learn.” It’s a library of...