UIEtips: Content and Design Are Inseparable Work Partners

It’s not uncommon within organizations that web site content is treated differently and separately from the web site design process. Yet the users do not separate the two and see it as one experience. When the content and design process are not done hand-in-hand, poor user experiences is often the result. Today’s article focuses on this issue. Tying together your content and design process is such an important issue that we’ve brought in Steph Hay to do a full day workshop on it at the UI19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29. Steph will show you how to map conversations as a first step to designing customer-centric user experiences.Learn more about Steph’s workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: It’s not news that the content is the important part of the design. For years, Karen McGrane has told us that working on the design without considering the content is like giving your best friend a beautifully wrapped empty box for their birthday. They’ll enjoy opening it, but will be sorely disappointed with the entirety results. And recently, Steph Hay reminded us that “content is the entire reason people come to the design in the first place.” The new thinking is that content creation and management cannot be a separate endeavor from design creation and management. That we need to inseparably integrate the two, structurally and organizationally, to create great experiences. Read the article: Content and Design are Inseparable Work Partners. What can your organization do to make design and content feel more integrated? Tell us about it...

Ahava Leibtag – Content: Messaging and Marketing

[ Transcript Available ] The goal of any site is to have great, compelling content. But what constitutes great content? How is the success of a blog post or a video measured? How can you be sure the time and effort put into crafting your content is providing an adequate return on investment? Ahava Leibtag believes that content is a conversation in a marketplace. In her virtual seminar, Designing Effective Content Marketing, Ahava discusses the challenges that organizations face when approaching content that not only dictates the user experience but also influences the bottom line. The audience asked some great questions during the live seminar and Ahava joins Adam Churchill to address some of those in this podcast. What are the most important channels to create content for and how do you prioritize? What if your content isn’t the type to “attract and acquire”? How do you handle content that may be technical or considered boring? How do you sort out the challenge of being responsible for multiple touch points? What are the signs that your content is no longer relevant or isn’t evergreen? When is the right time to bring the UX team into the content conversation? Recorded: March, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Hello, everyone, welcome to another edition of the Spoolcast. Earlier this year, Ahava Leibtag joined us to present her virtual seminar, “Designing Effective Content Marketing.” Ahava’s seminar, along with over 120 others, are now part of UIE’s “All You Can Learn.” It’s a library of...

Storymapping: A MacGyver Approach to Content Strategy, Part 2

By Lis Hubert and Donna Lichaw Published: March 25, 2014 “We’ll take a deeper dive into the research behind the narrative, storymapping approach, provide further insights into why we chose this approach, and provide details about how we used this approach with our client.” In Part I of this series on using a storymapping approach to content strategy, we told you about how a local nonprofit, Urban Arts Partnership, brought us a frequent client problem: their need to better understand, organize, and maintain the content for their EASE Program. We explained that, even though there are tried-and-true methods that we could have used to solve this problem—specifically, conducting stakeholder and user interviews during a typical discovery phase, leading to the creation of personas and a content inventory—they wouldn’t have worked for this project. We had realized that, given the short amount of time they had allotted for the project and the small budget that was available for our time, we needed to figure out a new way to help our clients get their heads around their content. So, we introduced our idea of adapting an old approach, storymapping, to solve Urban Arts’ problem on time and on budget. Now, in Part 2 of our series, we’ll take a deeper dive into the research behind the narrative, storymapping approach, provide further insights into why we chose this approach, and provide details about how we used this approach with our...

WYSIWYG Round Up

The conversation surrounding what content management systems and their accompanying WYSIWYG editors do, could do, and should do is a complex one, with myriad potential solutions. This week, Marli Mesibov brings us up to speed on the arguments for - and against - the next generation of WYSIWYG. The post WYSIWYG Round Up appeared first on UX...

Improve Your Mobile UX with These Six Podcasts

Below we feature the six UX luminaries giving full-day workshops at the UX Immersion Mobile Conference, April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Each of these podcasts brings insights on how to improve communication and workflow with your team and users. Structuring Your Workflow for Responsive Web Design by Ben Callahan With the need for the web to reconfigure and adapt to different devices and displays, designers and developers need to adapt to changing workflows. Ben discusses how to move towards an iterative and collaborative approach which in turn allows your clients to become more involved in the process. Listen to Ben’s podcast. The Challenges of Usability Testing Mobile Apps by Cyd Harrell Cyd Harrell has developed some good remote usability techniques that can be more effective, both in scope and cost as well as results, than a formal testing lab.( Even something as simple as “hugging” a laptop with the screen angled away from you and using the built in camera can give fantastic insights into how a user will interact with a mobile device.) Listen to Cyd’s podcast. Creating Responsive Interfaces by Brad Frost Frameworks and design patterns are no strangers in the world of web design. As responsive web design becomes common practice, making sure these templates work across every imaginable screen and device is trickier. Brad shares his concept of Atomic Design to tackle this challenge. Listen to Brad’s podcast. Responsive Web Design with Mobile in Mind by Jason Grigsby The ability for your site to display across screen sizes and devices, reduces development time and allows for one design to work anywhere. Jason the total experience...