Progressive Content for Progressive Reduction

Every new interface we come up with is also an exercise in instruction design. Designers typically leverage their user’s prior knowledge to create innovative experiences and help users learn how to navigate those those experiences. But how might we teach our users new, complex processes (or changes to their existing behavior) while still maintaining a simple UI? Last February Allan Grinshtein, an interaction designer at LayerVault, posited that because a user’s understanding of our application improves over time, our application’s interface should adapt. Others agree. Increasingly, designers are finding opportunities to design interfaces that better adapt, or personalize, their layouts and functions in accordance with their users’ individual knowledge—predominantly through progressive reduction and progressive disclosure. Progressive reduction is a theory that suggests that certain information should be diminished or simplified over time. This assumes that advanced users, who frequently access the application, will learn and remember basic functions and no longer need help text or additional labels. LayerVault shows how UI copy and design is personalized to different levels of user-expertise using the principle of progressive reduction. Image from LayerVault Blog. The insight behind progressive disclosure is similar: it relies on the belief that users need to have more complicated information ‘drip fed’ to them over a period of time. Jakob Nielsen puts it well: “Good usability includes ideas like progressive disclosure, where you show a small number of features to the less experienced user to lower the hurdle of getting started and yet have a larger number of features available for the expert to call up.” Progressive reduction and disclosure are theories that apply to presentation, but presentation...

Content-First UX Design: What Video Games Teach Us about UX, Our July 17 Virtual Seminar

Great UX design influences one video game becoming a cultural icon while another lands in the $5 bin at GameStop. So what cues can we take from these popular games—and from this technology-driven industry that so closely parallels our own? In her July 17 virtual seminar, Steph is going to teach us about two: Content-First UX Design and Contextual Learning. Attend this seminar, especially if you: Think “content before design” is a pipe dream Want a fresh-but-practical approach to designing for engagement Are looking for low-cost, low-fidelity ways to design faster Play video games Don’t play video games Make this seminar the first of 9 for your team by by registering for our 6 Month Program. Pay once, save your spot in all 9 UIE Virtual seminars from July –...

Steph Hay – Content-first User Experience

[ Transcript Available ] In traditional website design and development it’s common to start with the design and add your content later in the process. You may even use “lorem ipsum” as a placeholder to know where the content eventually needs to live. This causes the content creator to craft words to fit the design instead of building a design to fit the content. Without the right content your users will likely have a lackluster experience no matter how good-looking the design. Steph Hay is an advocate for a content-first approach. She believes it’s important to start with a simple document with all of the content that will be used to communicate with the user. By starting with a document, in plain language, as opposed to a wireframe or comp, all the stakeholders can have an informed discussion. No one needs to be educated on what they are looking at. Starting with the content helps focus the message you’re delivering to your users. When you build the design out from there, you can more easily determine where the appropriate places are for each type of communication. The site map and hierarchy are born out of the real content that will exist in the final product. You end up with a more cohesive and clear experience. Attend a daylong workshop with Steph at UI19 Steph’s UI19 workshop, Content-First UX Design, in Boston October 27 will show how to create more compelling products by first mapping the conversation you want to have with customers, then designing around it. Register with promotion code STEPHCAST and get $300 off the current conference price....

8 Ways to Boost Your Team’s UX Skills

You need a conference that will enhance your team’s skills so they are ready to successfully overcome the next set of challenges you’ve set out for them. What makes UI19 unique are the workshops. The conference is dedicated to educating and inspiring the UX professional. With two days of  full-day workshops your team can divide and conquer across eight specific topics. We guarantee they’ll learn skills, processes, and techniques to immediately impact your team and company. Mobile design Luke Wroblewski Design process Leah Buley Service-design thinking Marc Stickdorn Content-first design Steph Hay User scenarios Kim Goodwin Designing with type Tim Brown Microinteractions Dan Saffer Data visualization Stephen Anderson ————————————————————————————————————————————————————————– You can’t afford NOT to send them. Take advantage of the team discount and register 4 or more people at $200 off per person. Register Your Team and...

9 Brand-new UX Virtual Seminars for You

During the second half of 2014, you’ll hear the latest thinking from the best speakers in the world of user experience design. Get your team into all 9 live seminars from July through December and 6 months complimentary access to UIE’s All You Can Learn. We have some great presenters and topics lined up for you. With these educational events on your team’s calendar, you’re sure to develop and improve your core knowledge and skills. Jul 17 - Content-first UX Design, with Steph Hay Aug 07 - Minimum Viable Product, with Will Evans Aug 28 - UX Strategy, with James Kalbach Sep 18 - The UX Professional’s Guide to Working with Agile Scrum Teams, with Aviva Rosenstein Oct 09 - OKRs & Predictive Roadmaps, with Christina Wodtke Oct 23 - Mobile Research Techniques, with Cyd Harrell Nov 6 - Beyond Mobile, with Josh Clark Nov 20 - Orchestrating Experiences: Strategy and Design for Complex Product and Service Ecosystems, with Chris Risdon Dec 11 - Building Better Products with Content Strategies, with Jonathon Colman Sign-up Once. Pay Once. All live seminars July through December, 2014 and 6 months of access to All You Can Learn for only $1149. Register...