Defining a UX Design Strategy – Our August 28 Virtual Seminar

Establishing a realistic strategy is a creative endeavor based on analysis and results in a practical plan. Of course, it also can be a frustrating, ambiguous process fueled by pipe dreams and personal opinions. So what characteristics lead to concrete elements that will actually work for your team? In our August 28 virtual seminar, Defining a UX Design Strategy, Jim Kalbach shows you how to remove fuzziness from design discussions and inspire consistent action from diverse personalities. You’ll learn to: Define what strategy is and isn’t Use the UX Strategy Blueprint Develop a repeatable framework for decision?making Pitch your UX strategy to others If your strategy discussions feel more like political battles than progressive team-building, join us on August 28.  ...

Ahava Leibtag – Content: Messaging and Marketing

[ Transcript Available ] The goal of any site is to have great, compelling content. But what constitutes great content? How is the success of a blog post or a video measured? How can you be sure the time and effort put into crafting your content is providing an adequate return on investment? Ahava Leibtag believes that content is a conversation in a marketplace. In her virtual seminar, Designing Effective Content Marketing, Ahava discusses the challenges that organizations face when approaching content that not only dictates the user experience but also influences the bottom line. The audience asked some great questions during the live seminar and Ahava joins Adam Churchill to address some of those in this podcast. What are the most important channels to create content for and how do you prioritize? What if your content isn’t the type to “attract and acquire”? How do you handle content that may be technical or considered boring? How do you sort out the challenge of being responsible for multiple touch points? What are the signs that your content is no longer relevant or isn’t evergreen? When is the right time to bring the UX team into the content conversation? Recorded: March, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Hello, everyone, welcome to another edition of the Spoolcast. Earlier this year, Ahava Leibtag joined us to present her virtual seminar, “Designing Effective Content Marketing.” Ahava’s seminar, along with over 120 others, are now part of UIE’s “All You Can Learn.” It’s a library of...

Expand upon Traditional Content Strategy by Folding UX into the Conversation

In our February 20 virtual seminar, Ahava Leibtag shows you which techniques you can use to make content marketing work across organizational silos. She’ll show you how to explain content marketing to stakeholders, set up a pilot program in your organization, and collaborate on content that can be measured. You’ll learn how to Understand the value of content marketing Work collaboratively with cross-functional teams Find a starting point for measurement Measure how your content boosts revenue If you’ve ever wondered why no one knows the true business results of your content, then don’t miss Designing Effective Content Marketing.        ...

Jeff Gothelf – Axe Requirements-driven Product Design Live!

[ Transcript Available ] This is a sample of Jeff’s 90-minute talk from the User Interface 18 conference. There’s a traditional way of building a product. Normally there’s a huge time investment made as you come up with the idea, design, build and re-build until it’s released. At this point you’re hoping this solution solves the users’ problems, and also that it doesn’t crash and burn. And if it does fail, there’s going to be some hell to pay. Jeff Gothelf considers this “the old way” of product development. He posits that there is an immense amount of risk involved with this approach, and suggests that design and product development should be viewed as a hypothesis. Using this method, you’re putting hypotheses out there, testing them, and even if they fail, you’re continuously learning. With these “small bites” being taken, you can design with a comfort level, knowing you’re not putting the entire project at risk. You’re collecting data and therefore able to iterate based upon objective observations. If the data proves you’re heading down the wrong path, you can quickly kill the idea and move onto the next hypothesis. Want to hear more from Jeff? The recordings of the User Interface 18 conference are now available as UI18 OnDemand. Relive (or experience for the first time) all eight featured talks and Jared Spool’s informative and entertaining keynote. Get all of the details at uiconf.com. Recorded: December, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Jeff: Let me share another case study. This is a...

Jason Ulaszek & Brian Winters – From Research to Experience Roadmaps

[ Transcript Available ] Nowadays, design is an increasingly important business tool. As Jared Spool reminds us, Apple is one of the largest companies in the world, largely based upon continually engaging in good design. A great user experience can be a differentiator in the business landscape. For Jason Ulaszek, a good design starts with good research to guide and direct the organization’s decisions. Jason is the VP of Experience Design at Manifest Digital in Chicago. In his virtual seminar, Design as a Business Tool: Research to Experience Roadmaps, Jason discusses the influence designers in today’s world have in the overall direction of an organization and how the toolset that designers possess leads to better decisions about the user experience. In this podcast, Jason is joined by his co-worker Brian Winters and UIE’s Adam Churchill to address questions our audience had during the live seminar. What methods do you use to understand the competitive landscape? How early in the research process do you involve end users? Do you use observations in addition to interviews in your research? How do you apply a mental model or gap analysis to a new product or service? Is there an online tool available for creating mental models? What is the difference between an experience map and a mental model? How do mental models and story mapping compare? How do you avoid jumping immediately to solutions? Recorded: October, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Welcome, everyone, to another edition of the SpoolCast. Recently, Jason Ulaszek joined...