Designing Digital Strategies, Part 1: Cartography

As digital products and services come to comprise an increasingly important part of our everyday life, the division between the digital and the physical begins to blur. We can, for instance, see a washing machine on TV, read reviews of it online, purchase it on our phone, and have it installed by our local shop—all […] The post Designing Digital Strategies, Part 1: Cartography appeared first on UX...

UIEtips: Designs and deliverables are haikus, not epic poems

In today’s UIEtips, we’re publishing an excerpt from the UXmatters article “Developing UX Agility: Letting Go of Perfection” by Carissa Demetris, Chris Farnum, Joanna Markel, and Serena Rosenhan. In it, Chris Farnum talks about design deliverables and their role in an incremental approach to your design. If you want to hear more about Chris’ thinking on design deliverables join us for our January 30 virtual seminar Choosing the Right Wireframe Strategy for Your Project. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Once you have a firm grasp of the goals for a project and the functionality you need to design, the next steps for many UX professionals are creating user stories, wireframes, and prototypes. To kick off design, we often brainstorm and sketch. Often, cutting edge Web sites and a desire to meet or exceed competitors fuel our ideas in part. While you are in brainstorm mode, it’s certainly a good idea to sketch out a full user experience, complete with all the latest bells and whistles that would delight users and impress stakeholders. But when you begin to craft a user experience for the initial stories that you’ll deliver to your Development team for implementation, you’ll need to be a strict editor and include only the core user interface elements. Limiting scope in this way can be challenging when you are used to waterfall approach, in which you may have only one chance to document all of the user interface elements you think your design should include. Read the article Designs and Deliverables are Haikus, Not Epic Poems. How does your team limit project scope in the early design stages? Tell us about it...

Fail Fast, Fail Often: An Interview with Victor Lombardi

What can we learn from failure? A great deal, says Victor Lombardi. In his latest book, Why We Fail, Victor tells over a dozen stories of projects gone awry and how their lack of success can inform our design strategy. The post Fail Fast, Fail Often: An Interview with Victor Lombardi appeared first on UX...

Jeff Gothelf: The Champion of Lean UX

Jeff Gothelf knows better than anyone the importance of validating product ideas and concepts early in the design process to ensure you’re on the right track. He also knows the value of using rapid prototyping techniques and how to focus your efforts on achieving a business outcome rather than building features. If you agree with these ideas and want  to learn how to escape product requirement hell using Lean UX, read on. In the below post, you’ll find some great free articles and podcasts around Lean UX and Agile. But you can really dive in deep at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. In Jeff Gothelf’s workshop Escaping Product Requirement Hell Using Lean UX, You’ll learn to prioritize an endless backlog of ideas and features by talking about business outcomes earlier in your process — collaboratively — with your entire team. You will also get to see why you don’t have to build an entire product to understand if the idea has real value. Here’s some reading about Lean UX Why Lean UX? - Jeff Gothelf Jeff Gothelf lays out the rationale for why Lean UX is something new and why it’s important now Is There Any Meat on This Lean UX Thing?- Jared M. Spool Jared sets out to learn what Lean UX was all about. He talked to dozens of folks in all areas of the UX field and dug into what people mean when they talk about it. Designing with Remote Teams – Jeff Gothelf Jeff explains how to make designing work with remote teams. While the benefits of in-person collaboration and communication are...