Mobile UX Design That Delights

How often do you start researching a product, reading an article, or listening to a podcast on one device and finish up on another? Common, right? Well your users are doing it too, and if you’re not creating delightful, cross-platform experiences—you’re likely to lose them. The increasing use of mobile devices makes designing sites and apps more complex. To design for the user, you have to completely change the way you use to work and learn new tools, techniques, and patterns for success. We’ve created a conference that focuses on the skills you need to create pleasing experiences for your customers regardless of the device they use. At the UX Immersion Mobile Conference, you’ll be led by industry experts on an intense dive into game-changing, mobile UX challenges. Brad Frost will focus on establishing a practical foundation and workflow so your team can build responsive, adaptive interfaces. You’ll discuss how to use layout, image, and navigation patterns to design future-friendly experiences. Karen McGrane wants to help you transform existing content into packages that work for your CMS, people, and users. You’ll learn how to publish content to many devices using one, author-centric workflow. Mobile changes everything about how we conduct usability research. Cyd Harrell will let you in on the latest techniques for interviewing, gathering data, and involving your entire team. Ease into mobile prototyping with Nate Schutta and discover that building prototypes using JavaScript and jQuery isn’t a black art. Dabble at using HTML and CSS in a text editor to debug what you’ve built. You don’t even have to be a coder for his workshop! Dispel your...

Just 51 Spots Left at the $1,389 Price for UX Immersion Mobile Conference

UXIM 2014 will sell out again. Get your spot now at the $1389 rate. With more users accessing your sites and products via mobile, it’s critical to provide a strongly integrated experience. These UX luminaries will provide you with intensive, game-changing material that will change how you think about and design for mobile. Brad Frost – Using Design Patterns to Build Responsive Experiences Cyd Harrell - Conducting Usability Research for Mobile Apps Ben Callahan – Workflow on Responsive Web Design Projects Karen McGrane – Adapting Your Content for Mobile Jason Grigsby – Doing Mobile-First Responsive Web Design Nate Schutta – Coding Prototypes, Even if You’ve Never Tried Why are you waiting for this must-attend event of 2014 to sell out? Explore the conference and register at the lowest price possible before the $1,389...

UIEtips: Devising a Strategy for Responsive Design

In today’s UIEtips, I’m sharing a reprint of an article on the importance of organizations nailing down a strategy for making their sites responsive. Saying yes to responsive design will require changes to your editorial process, the ways you approach visual and interaction design, and how you think about your users and their goals. And if your team struggles with how to design responsively, then you’ll want join us for Stephen Hay’s December 12 virtual seminar on Responsive Web Design Workflows. Stephen Hay has a practical approach to improving your responsive web design workflow. Here’s an excerpt from the article: A responsive design can have multiple breakpoints, say for a small-screen phone, then a large-screen phone, then a tablet, then a laptop/desktop. Many teams try to decide on breakpoints using average screen sizes. However, it’s better to look at what the content and navigation wants to be. By letting the content and navigation drive the breakpoints, teams find they can often get away with fewer screen configurations. For example, a high-resolution Retina iPad might easily share the same configuration as a well-constructed laptop display, while lower resolution tablets might just need a little adjustment to that same configuration. Read the article Devising a Strategy for Responsive Design. What are your strategies for preparing a responsive design? Tell us about it...

At $1,389, UXIM 2014 will sell out fast so get your spot now

If creating designs that function across multiple devices is important to you, then you’ll want a seat at the UX Immersion Mobile Conference in Denver, April 7-9, 2014 (Pssst. Last year sold out.) Designing for cross-platform experiences affects every phase of your projects — user research, content flow, page break-up and patterns, and the ways users input data. Even project managers must approach workflow differently. Be sure to save your spot early and take advantage of the $1,389 price. There’s only 100 80 spots at that price. Reserve your spot soon before the conference sells out. Not convinced yet? Here’s what some folks had to say about last year’s sold out UX Immersion Mobile Conference: Speakers are of a very high caliber. I totally feel that I got my money’s worth–and I paid for my own attendance!   – C. Azzarello It really was an amazing conference. Rarely have I ever been to a three day conference where I learned so much. The full day workshops were very structured and the speakers seemed to be able to tailor their talks to the diverse makeup of the group. -  B. Hughes Explore the conference at...

UIEtips: Progressive Enhancement and the Content-out Approach

Today, there exists a sea of design considerations like browsers, accessibility, device compatibility, and responsive or adaptive design. And with new techniques and devices coming out daily, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Fortunately, Aaron Gustafson knows how to wrangle all of these elements using progressive enhancement. With his practical approach, he designs for humans on any spectrum – with and without javascript enabled. In 2011, he published Adaptive Web Design: Crafting Rich Experiences with Progressive Enhancement. In today’s UIEtips, we’re pleased to publish an excerpt from Aaron’s book which discusses how progressive enhancement can serve your users by giving them access to content without technological restrictions. On November 21, Aaron will present our next virtual seminar, Designing Across Devices with Progressive Enhancement. If you’re trying to create a better web – and are open to rethinking how you approach designing for any interface, then you need to join us for Aaron’s seminar. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Fundamentally, progressive enhancement is about accessibility, but not in the limited sense the term is most often used. The term “accessibility” is traditionally used to denote making content available to individuals with “special needs” (people with limited motility, cognitive disabilities, or visual impairments); progressive enhancement takes this one step further by recognizing that we all have special needs. Our special needs may also change over time and within different contexts. When I load up a website on my phone, for example, I am visually limited by my screen resolution (especially if I am using a browser that encourages zooming) and I am limited in my ability to interact with buttons and...