Whitney Quesenbery and Lainey Feingold – Structured Negotiations

[ Transcript Available ] If you work in user experience or accessibility, you probably spend part of your time on advocacy–making the case for a new design idea or a new way of working. Lawsuits are the ultimate way to get two sides to come to an agreement, but it’s also an extremely confrontational style of advocacy. A more collaborative process might be a better way to reach your goal with an agreement that is a win for everyone. Lainey Feingold is a disability rights lawyer with an extraordinary record of landmark cases, including settlements with some big companies that have made their sites more accessible. She’s done all this using Structured Negotiations, a process that lets a group of people work together to find a solution to a problem. It takes active patience, flexibility, grounded optimism, confidence, trust, and a empathy to be successful at Structured Negotiations. Lainey joins Whitney Quesenbery for this episode of A Podcast for Everyone to answer questions about this new way of reaching agreements. What are Structured Negotiations? Why are they more effective than lawsuits? How can you used the concepts in structured negotiations for UX advocacy? What are the characteristics of a good negotiator? Resources mentioned in this podcast. Law Office of Lainey Feingold About Structured Negotiations Examples of Web Accessibility Settlements Recorded: March, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Whitney Quesenbery: Hi. I’m Whitney Quesenbery, and I’m co-author with Sarah Horton of “A Web for Everyone for Rosenfeld Media.” Today, I’m talking to Lainey Feingold....

Sarah Horton and Larry Goldberg – Discussing CVAA

[ Transcript Available ] If you work in media broadcasting or telecommunications you have probably heard of the U.S. legislation called CVAA, shorthand for the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act. This law, signed by President Obama in October 2010, seeks to ensure that accessibility requirements keep pace with advances in communication technologies. Like most legal documents, CVAA is difficult to decipher. It’s difficult to extract the key points and determine what actions we need to take. Lucky for us, Larry Goldberg is here to help. Larry was co-chair of the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (VPAAC), which provided reports that helped shape the legislation. He joins Sarah Horton for this episode of A Podcast for Everyone to answer key questions, including: How did CVAA get started and what is it for? What do web professionals need to know about CVAA? Are there standards we should be looking to for guidance on CVAA compliance? Larry Goldberg is Director of Community Engagement at WGBH, the company that pioneered captioned television in 1972. He has been with WGBH since 1985, for many years of which as Director of the Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family National Center for Accessible Media, and has been a leader in advancing accessible media at WGBH and worldwide. Resources mentioned in this podcast Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act – FCC Encyclopedia The Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) at WGBH Recorded: March, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Sarah Horton: Hi, I’m Sarah...

Sharron Rush and Whitney Quesenbery – Accessibility Easy Checks

[ Transcript Available ] If you’ve just been put in charge of making a site or app works for everyone, the most daunting step might just be the first one. Sure, there are standards, but sometimes they raise more questions than they answer. What you need is an easy way to get started. And Easy Checks may be just what you need. Sharron Rush heads the Easy Checks project at the Web Accessibility Initiative. These simple steps help you get an idea of whether a site meets some of the basics for good accessibility, without any special technology or tools. She joins Whitney Quesenbery for this episode of A Podcast for Everyone to answer some of these questions. What are the Easy Checks, and why are they needed? Can anyone use the Easy Checks? Is there special equipment needed? What’s the best way for a project team to get started with accessibility? How do usability and accessibility fit together when you are evaluating a web site? Sharron Rush has been an advocate, a learner, and a teacher of accessible technology for 15 years. She is Executive Director of Knowbility and an Invited Expert to the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative where she co-chairs the Education and Outreach Working Group, which wrote the Easy Checks. Resources mentioned in this podcast: Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility Knowbility’s Access U Web Accessibility Initiative Recorded: February, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Whitney Quesenbery: Hi everyone. Welcome to this episode of “A Podcast for Everyone.”...

Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery – Introducing A Podcast for Everyone

[ Transcript Available ] In this premiere episode of A Podcast for Everyone, UIE’s Adam Churchill interviews Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery about the book that inspired the podcast, A Web for Everyone. They describe their journey in creating the book and share their perspectives on the importance of accessible user experience. They also provide suggestions for how product teams can use the book to support their practice. At the end, they introduce A Podcast for Everyone, a companion to the book, and give a preview of what they will be talking about in upcoming episodes. Links mentioned in this podcast A Web for Everyone Access by Design Web Style Guide Storytelling the User Experience Global UX Center for Civic Design Universal Principles of Design Principles of Universal Design Section 508 Refresh Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Recorded: February, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the first in a new series of recordings we’re calling “A Podcast for Everyone.” The concept for this podcast comes from Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery, co-authors of “A Web for Everyone,” their new book from Rosenfeld Media. Whether you’re in charge of the user experience, development, or strategy for a website, “A Web for Everyone” is sure to help you make the site accessible without sacrificing design or innovation. I’m Adam Churchill, your host for this companion podcast. A bit about our authors. Sarah Horton is director of accessible user experience and design for The Paciello Group. She works with companies and...

UIEtips: Explore These 7 Great Podcasts from 2013

This past year we featured some fantastic podcasts from a variety of UX luminaries. It was difficult to cull the list but we managed to do just that. Here for your listening pleasure are our favorite podcasts from 2013. Designing Microinteractions Do you think about the ringer on your phone and the ability to turn it off? Dan Saffer uses this example to kick off his book Microinteractions. Silencing the ringer on your phone is a common feature. If that feature is clunky or hard to find, it interferes with needing to silence it quickly, in a crowded movie theater for example. These tiny interactions that surround the main functionality are integral to rounding out the entire experience. Listen to the podcast Lean UX: Escaping Product Requirement Hell Assumptions tend to be the downfall of many research projects. Jeff Gothelf suggests starting with an attitude that you’re testing a hypothesis which leads to a more open discussion. The main thing is, hypotheses, just like design, can change. Being flexible and iterative in your design process encourages an environment of collaboration. Listen to the podcast When Responsive Design Meets the Real World Responsive web design allows the notion of “one web” to be a reality. Designers are increasingly able to sell to their organization the idea of delivering content to multiple platforms. Putting it into practice is another story. Jason Grigsby, co-founder of Cloud Four, says that it is easier to sell the idea of responsive web design than to do it well. Listen to the podcast Prototyping for Mobile Designs Building a prototype is a great way to test...