If It Isn’t Broken, Don’t Fix It

By Pabini Gabriel-Petit Published: March 10, 2014 “Over the last few years, I’ve been noticing a disturbing trend in UX design: changes in the design of successful software user interfaces that actually degrade rather than enhance the user experience.” Over the last few years, I’ve been noticing a disturbing trend in UX design: changes in the design of successful software user interfaces that actually degrade rather than enhance the user experience. This seems to happen for a variety of reasons—for example, because of designers conforming slavishly to current design trends such as minimalism or flat design rather than focusing on meeting users’ needs companies’ leaders wanting their UX designers to create “cool” rather than usable user interfaces UX teams not doing usability testing or other user research that would validate a new design approach rather than being committed to doing user-centered design designers disregarding the power of users’ kinesthetic memory when rethinking application layouts rather than giving it the respect that it warrants designers succumbing to the egotistical desire to put their personal stamp on the design of software user interfaces rather than recognizing and preserving the value that products have long provided to users designers making changes for the sake of change alone rather than strategically driving change to deliver greater value to users companies engaging in feature wars with their competitors—causing their software user interfaces to become bloated with unnecessary features—rather than striving to differentiate their offerings in the marketplace companies crafting user experiences that selfishly further their business goals rather than deriving business value by meeting users’ needs better companies releasing software whose quality is not up to snuff because they’ve rushed it to market without adequate testing and debugging

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