Jim Kalbach – Identifying a UX Design Strategy

[ Transcript Available ] The concept of strategy can be fuzzy at best. And the word strategy tends to hold a different meaning depending on who you’re talking to. Jim Kalbach says that strategy needs to show causality. He defines it as a hypothesis of a desired position, and a belief about how you’re going to succeed and overcome challenges. In his virtual seminar, Defining a UX Design Strategy, Jim details the elements of strategy. He shares this in the form of his UX Strategy Blueprint a tool he uses to explore and generate strategies in his own work. Jim fielded a lot of questions from the audience during the seminar. He joins Adam Churchill to answer some of those in this podcast. How does UX strategy differ from product strategy? Can this be applied at the product level or is this just a byproduct of the process? Can UX designers become strategists? What does “upward alignment” mean in the strategy hierarchy? Is UX strategy independent of business of product strategy? Recorded: September, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Welcome everyone to the SpoolCast. Recently, Jim Kalbach presented a fantastic virtual seminar for our audience. It’s called “Defining a UX Design Strategy.” The recording of this seminar along with over 175 other UX seminars are now part of UIE’s “All You Can Learn.” Establishing a realistic strategy is a creative endeavor, based on analysis, and it results in a practical plan. Of course, it can also be a frustrating ambiguous process...

Exploring the Google Glass UX

As wearable devices enter the mainstream, UX designers must develop ways to maximize those devices’ potential while acknowledging the new limitations they impose. That’s what the software team at ELEKS concluded after evaluating Google Glass – an experience that allowed them to abandon their expectations about head-mounted wearables, adapt user experiences to tiny screens, and forget about keyboards altogether. For many UX designers, Google Glass evokes visions of an Iron Man-like interface with numerous controls and augmented reality features. Our team at ELEKS, too, fell victim to these assumptions. It was only after designing and developing multiple applications for Google Glass that we began to truly understand its distinctive features – and how to work within its limitations. In particular, we came across numerous technical and contextual challenges that few in the UX space will have encountered before. As the market for Google Glass, and thus the market for compatible applications continues to expand, we feel it is of vital importance for UX designers to share their experiences creating applications for the device. It’s in this spirit that we’re sharing our own. Photo Credit: lawrencegs via Compfight cc Technological limitations We began playing with Glass in August of 2013. Since then, our team of designers, analysts and engineers has worked on seven related projects, ranging from business concepts to fully operational applications. Most of the projects catered to unique usage scenarios and provided an application from which clients can benefit, either by opening new opportunities or by optimizing business processes. First, we discovered that the predominant way to interact with Google Glass was via Mirror API, which showed text...

UIEtips: How Agile UX Can Be a Cost Effective Approach

In this week’s UIEtips, we reprint an article from Jared Spool. In it, he shares ideas on getting low-cost iterations into your Agile development process. Jared also makes the case that UX-focused design is a team sport. If you’re looking for more on tying UX design and your Agile process together, then you’re going to want to join us on September 18, when Aviva Rosenstein presents our next virtual seminar, Making UX Work with Agile Scrum Teams. Here’s an excerpt from the article: It’s tempting to let those UX-focused design team members do this early work while the rest of the team goes off and does other activities. However, the biggest value from these early iterations comes from the discussions and insights that emerge. The most successful teams involve everyone who will influence the eventual design—including developers and stakeholders—in their design studios and paper prototyping activities. Read the article: Cost Effective Approaches to Iteration in Agile UX. What techniques are you using to reduce the costs of iteration for your team? Leave us a note...

Three Things I’ve Realized about UX While Riding My Bike to Work

September 8, 2014As I approach my 30s, I’m trying to integrate new habits into my life. Luckily, I live in New York City, where potential new habits wait around every street corner. One of the newest habits I’ve picked up is biking to work on a regular basis, which has now become my main method of transportation around the city.I get to work 15 minutes faster, avoid the overly cramped subways, and enjoy the city scenery while feeling the rush of wind on my face. Now that I am an experienced biker, there is something exhilarating about having free range to zip around the city wherever I want. However, in the beginning, this freedom was not something I took advantage of or even wanted. At first, I was completely focused on the rules of the road while riding because I had to be. I was dealing with a lot of new variables I hadn’t thought about or experienced before...read more By Andres Bohorquez...

Making UX Work with Agile Scrum Teams – Our September 18 Virtual Seminar

Where does UX design fit into sprints? How do companies let go of Waterfall methodology? If you’re struggling to confidently and clearly answer either of these questions, then it’s time to register for Aviva Rosenstein’s seminar. You’ll learn how to clarify roles and responsibilities, and more effectively track and estimate UX work. You’ll also hear case studies of companies that brought teams together to work more collaboratively, iteratively, and harmoniously in an Ag?ile process. Learn from teams who’ve “been there, done that” Increase the value of UX in your organization Get scrum teams involved in UX If your team could benefit from Aviva’s seminar, join us on September 18....

Bruce McCarthy – Product Management Meets UX

[ Transcript Available ] Product roadmaps are a useful tool for managers and the development they oversee. Usability testing and research informs user experience decisions. Both of these goals, in the end, benefit the users. So why can’t your process contribute to both of these goals? Bruce McCarthy, through his years of experience, has developed a methodology to get the product and UX teams working in concert. Using clickable prototypes and mockups lets the product team prioritize their roadmap and the UX team get early feedback. This creates an environment to inform the design without committing a lot of time and resources to it. With both teams validating their assumptions you can arrive at the right path faster. Bruce received a lot of questions during his seminar, Lean Roadmapping: Where Product Management and UX Meet. He joins Adam Churchill to address some of those in this podcast. How do you handle disagreements on what should be prioritized? Should you have separate road maps for product development and higher level management? When is it ok to use a lower fidelity prototype? How do you find interview participants for your research? What approach do you take to sifting through the data you collect? How can you be confident when showing the design to only a small number of people? How does this process apply to a more mature product versus an MVP? Recorded: July, 2014 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Adam Churchill: Welcome, everyone, to the SpoolCast. A few weeks ago, Bruce McCarthy presented a...