Five Tips for Conducting Scientific Research in the UX World

Despite the fact that research plays such a pivotal role in the practice of user-centered design, much has been written about how to approach it in a “quick and dirty” manner. Why the rush? I believe that the application of a more rigorous, scientific methodology could lend some much-needed credibility to our approach. My love story with research began almost a decade ago. One day, while working as a novice prototyper, I was instructed to get feedback from customers. So — awkwardly — I introduced my ideas to potential users. Some told me what they liked; others gently glossed over what they would improve. I came away feeling accomplished. Little did I know. My subsequent training as a scientific researcher helped me see the error of my ways. I realized that, in that moment, I used biased responses to inform my design. I heard what I wanted and not necessarily what I needed. A rigorous approach to research provides a much clearer path to unbiased findings, findings that go a long way towards informing our design. This article covers five perspectives to that end. Starting with research plans, we’ll cover details of testing methodologies and even the role of the researcher herself. Finally, we’ll discuss the ways these tips apply to our research in practice. Go back to where it all began All scientific research projects begin with a research plan, a document that outlines: The problem (or the research questions) to be explored, A summary of existing literature, The hypothesis(es) or an extrapolation of any patterns evident in the existing literature, The research participants who will take part...