UIEtips: The Dirty Dozen Roadmap Roadblocks

In this week’s UIEtips, we share an article from Bruce McCarthy. In it, Bruce defines the product roadmap and offers twelve areas where organizations break down when developing roadmaps. Best of all, he shares ideas on how to put all twelve roadblocks in your rearview mirror. Want to hear more from Bruce? He’s presenting our next virtual seminar on June 26, Lean Roadmapping: Where Product Management & UX Meet. Here’s an excerpt from the article: A good roadmap inspires. It inspires buy-in from executives, inspires confidence from customers and salespeople, and inspires development teams to produce the groundbreaking products that drive significant growth.  A good roadmap keeps your organization on course toward its destination. Stating what you will do and when makes it easy to judge when you fall behind schedule or get detoured by good ideas that just don’t fit your strategic vision. Read the article: The Dirty Dozen Roadmap Roadblocks. What roadblocks have challenged your organization in creating product roadmaps?  Leave us a note...

UIEtips: Customizing Help and Tips by Input Type

It’s not uncommon that an interaction for an app on a mobile device is completely different than a desktop. Could inline help be the answer to communicating the necessary action? It’s not so easy as that as Luke Wroblewski points out in this week’s UIEtips. You still have to surface the hidden interface. Thinking about mobile design first is Luke’s mantra and what he’ll focus on in his full day workshop at this year’s User Interface Conference, October 27-29 in Boston. Explore how Luke will shift your thinking beyond the desktop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: A common way to provide relevant bits of guidance inside an application is through inline help. Inline help is positioned where it’s most useful in an interface and made visible by default so people don’t have to do anything to reveal it. This makes it an effective way to tell people how to use an interface. But what happens when those instructions vary by input type. Read the article: Customizing Help and Tips by Input Type. How do you and your team create interfaces that work with different screen sizes and input types? Leave us a note...

UIEtips: Content and Design Are Inseparable Work Partners

It’s not uncommon within organizations that web site content is treated differently and separately from the web site design process. Yet the users do not separate the two and see it as one experience. When the content and design process are not done hand-in-hand, poor user experiences is often the result. Today’s article focuses on this issue. Tying together your content and design process is such an important issue that we’ve brought in Steph Hay to do a full day workshop on it at the UI19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29. Steph will show you how to map conversations as a first step to designing customer-centric user experiences.Learn more about Steph’s workshop. Here’s an excerpt from the article: It’s not news that the content is the important part of the design. For years, Karen McGrane has told us that working on the design without considering the content is like giving your best friend a beautifully wrapped empty box for their birthday. They’ll enjoy opening it, but will be sorely disappointed with the entirety results. And recently, Steph Hay reminded us that “content is the entire reason people come to the design in the first place.” The new thinking is that content creation and management cannot be a separate endeavor from design creation and management. That we need to inseparably integrate the two, structurally and organizationally, to create great experiences. Read the article: Content and Design are Inseparable Work Partners. What can your organization do to make design and content feel more integrated? Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Dissecting Design – Part 2

In this week’s UIEtips, we offer part two of Ben Callahan’s article, Dissecting Design. In it, he explores which tools are the most helpful for different parts of the design process. Ben was one of our top speakers at this year’s UX Immersion Mobile Conference and we’re pleased to have him back for our next virtual seminar on June 5, Responsive Workflows: Because There’s No Such Thing as a Perfect Process. Here’s an excerpt from the article: I believe many people in our industry struggle with “design in the browser” simply because they aren’t fluent with the tools needed for working that way. I’ve heard many people say, “Happy accidents don’t happen in code like they do in PhotoShop.” I can testify that this is absolutely not true. Instead, I believe it’s about where you are the most fluent. As we evaluate the best tools for the monumental task of problem solving in design, I keep coming back to the ideal of fluency as a solid principle on which to base the decision. You can’t write poetry in a language you don’t speak. Similarly, you can’t craft design using tools you’re not fluent with. Read part two of the article here. Missed part one? Read it here. What tools do you and your team find most efficient and effective in solving design problems?  Tell us about it...

UIEtips: Dissecting Design – Part 1

In this week’s UIEtips, Ben Callahan dissects the design process to explore which tools are the most helpful for different parts of the process. Ben was one of our top speakers at this year’s UX Immersion Conference, and he’s also presenting our next virtual seminar on June 5, Responsive Workflows: Because There’s No Such Thing as a Perfect Process. Here’s an excerpt from the article: In the past few years, we’ve recognized the danger in jumping headfirst into full-comp design before we really understand the design direction. Other disciplines have recognized this for a long time-think mood boards in branding-and taken steps to ramp up their design effort. The goal here is to establish the basic building blocks we’ll use in the rest of the design process: things like color, type, texture, illustration style, photography treatment, iconography. Once these are established, the success rate for the rest of the process is greatly increased. There are a number of ways to do this on the web; let’s look at a few. Read part one of the two part article: Dissecting Design. How does your team handle design? Leave us a note...